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CBC ..... the over-the-hill-mob (Cherry, Cole, McLean, et al). TGFRDS (thank goodness for RDS).

Don Cherry after watching the Bruins and Chara get away with the Pacioretty incident,believes he can say and do whatever he wants,the same as the Bruins.The NHL in all of its wisdom have crossed the line so often and rubbed the viewers faces in their garbage so many times,I believe they are trying to find out whether we are deaf,dumb and blind.Well I have seen enough to last me to my grave,the constant barrage of insults to our intelligence leaves me dumbfounded,I was under the impression fans were appreciated not only that,but necessary.

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CBC doing some backtracking today. Stated that Cherry's opinion was his own and not shared by them.

Maybe they're about to use that muzzle again. Should have never taken it off and should have canned his butt the last time he stepped over the line. Just a question of time before he hangs himself for good IMO.

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Cherry is an old school hockey coach who never played in the NHL or had to fight NHL enforcers.

I thought he made a good point, then totally made a fool out of himself.

The focus is on enforcers, but I'd like to see how many x-nhlers (non-enforcers) had substances abuse problems. I'm pretty sure you'd be surprised to know that probably a lot of them turned to drugs and alcohol after their careers were over and during their careers (Grant Furh was known to have a severe substance abuse problem when he played for the oilers).

It's hard for any professional athlete to see their career come to an end. Why do you think we see so many of them go into coaching, broadcasting or scouting.

NHLers today play about 6-7 months out of the year, but it doesn't mean they have the next 6 months off to lounge around at home. Many take a month or so to visit friends and family, then they're back in the gym getting ready for a new season.

I'm sure a lot turn to drugs or alcohol just out of sheer boredom. Then there's the whole shock of not being in the media spotlight and that old mid-life crisis thing.

Imo it's no coincidence that many x-NHLers get involved in coaching (even at a low level), join the NHLnetwork team or head over-seas to scout for young talent.

Yes it's stressful being an enforcer, but it's just as stressful being an NHL tender. Even the great ken dryden would throw up before every game. If he had that reaction before a game, I can imagine he had many a sleepless night prior to big games. Playing hockey in the 70's I'm sure he enjoyed a few drinks on the eve of a big game.

The difference for dryden was that he had a career following his hockey career. He planned for it as he played for our Habs. Going to McGill studying law, as well playing hockey.

All this to say, I don;t think substance abuse following a professional sports career is something only x-enforcers face.

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The difference for dryden was that he had a career following his hockey career. He planned for it as he played for our Habs. Going to McGill studying law, as well playing hockey.

This is what I've been saying too. We have all these kids coming into the NHL with little to no education. How much school did Crosby have? Hall, Eberle, Price, Subban etc.? Now think about the guys who are mediocre went the major junior route then through the AHL from 19 on. In Ontario you're about 17-18 when you start your first year of University. By 22 you're looking at graduating if you're lucky. At 22, most of these guys are looking to break into the NHL. They play for what? 5 odd years if they're lucky? Then what? No education and nothing to fall back on. This is something that goes beyond hockey. I work at a tutoring agency right now part time, you wouldn't believe how many kids who need the help don't get end up getting it because their parents think they're going to be the next hockey star or baseball/football/soccer star. These are kids anywhere from grade 6 and up. Their parents put more emphasis on sports than school. Even if they make it to the AHL, the 1 percent that do, and then get a taste of the NHL, they have nothing to fall back on. Maybe Canada needs to take a look at how it's hockey program works. As fans, we want to see these kids fast tracked to the league. The reality is, they should be made to get a full education before they make that jump. High school isn't going to get you anywhere these days, hell a B.A. isn't going to get you anywhere either. You need to further yourself now before you can make a career. These players, they all have one goal and no back up. Of course they're going to turn to drugs and alcohol when it comes crashing down.

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This is what I've been saying too. We have all these kids coming into the NHL with little to no education. How much school did Crosby have? Hall, Eberle, Price, Subban etc.? Now think about the guys who are mediocre went the major junior route then through the AHL from 19 on. In Ontario you're about 17-18 when you start your first year of University. By 22 you're looking at graduating if you're lucky. At 22, most of these guys are looking to break into the NHL. They play for what? 5 odd years if they're lucky? Then what? No education and nothing to fall back on. This is something that goes beyond hockey. I work at a tutoring agency right now part time, you wouldn't believe how many kids who need the help don't get end up getting it because their parents think they're going to be the next hockey star or baseball/football/soccer star. These are kids anywhere from grade 6 and up. Their parents put more emphasis on sports than school. Even if they make it to the AHL, the 1 percent that do, and then get a taste of the NHL, they have nothing to fall back on. Maybe Canada needs to take a look at how it's hockey program works. As fans, we want to see these kids fast tracked to the league. The reality is, they should be made to get a full education before they make that jump. High school isn't going to get you anywhere these days, hell a B.A. isn't going to get you anywhere either. You need to further yourself now before you can make a career. These players, they all have one goal and no back up. Of course they're going to turn to drugs and alcohol when it comes crashing down.

Its true, ive seen several kids play a bit in the CHL, clearly nto make it, but can't give up the dream that their going to the big leagues. Same with kids who never even make it to the CHL, kids are putting all this effort into AAA and Junior B hockey expecting a big scholarship to a US college and then get drafted into the NHL. Some just don't know when their not good enough.

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Its true, ive seen several kids play a bit in the CHL, clearly nto make it, but can't give up the dream that their going to the big leagues. Same with kids who never even make it to the CHL, kids are putting all this effort into AAA and Junior B hockey expecting a big scholarship to a US college and then get drafted into the NHL. Some just don't know when their not good enough.

They want to work for a scholarship to a US college, all the power to them. They should stick around the 4 years if they get it and get that education. It's the other ones, that you mention, that make no sense to me. Their parents hold some accountability for sure too. You got to explain to your kids that sports isn't the be all and end all of life. Or, maybe that's just the educator in me and all anyone really needs is sports.

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This is what I've been saying too. We have all these kids coming into the NHL with little to no education. How much school did Crosby have? Hall, Eberle, Price, Subban etc.? Now think about the guys who are mediocre went the major junior route then through the AHL from 19 on. In Ontario you're about 17-18 when you start your first year of University. By 22 you're looking at graduating if you're lucky. At 22, most of these guys are looking to break into the NHL. They play for what? 5 odd years if they're lucky? Then what? No education and nothing to fall back on. This is something that goes beyond hockey. I work at a tutoring agency right now part time, you wouldn't believe how many kids who need the help don't get end up getting it because their parents think they're going to be the next hockey star or baseball/football/soccer star. These are kids anywhere from grade 6 and up. Their parents put more emphasis on sports than school. Even if they make it to the AHL, the 1 percent that do, and then get a taste of the NHL, they have nothing to fall back on. Maybe Canada needs to take a look at how it's hockey program works. As fans, we want to see these kids fast tracked to the league. The reality is, they should be made to get a full education before they make that jump. High school isn't going to get you anywhere these days, hell a B.A. isn't going to get you anywhere either. You need to further yourself now before you can make a career. These players, they all have one goal and no back up. Of course they're going to turn to drugs and alcohol when it comes crashing down.

As you know RDS, I read a lot. I read a book last year (don't ask me which one) in which they touched on this.

It's much better than it use to be, but it's no where near the states. Since American born players play at the college and university level, they are forced to take classes and pass if they want to continue to play hockey.

Hockey Canada has made strides to do something similar. Those kids who never make it to the NHL, do have a certain amount of money they receive to pay for schooling if they don't go into the NHL. This part is a lil foggy, but I also believe there's a players fund that will pay an x-NHLer some schooling if they choose to do so after their NHL careers, but I believe they are required to play a certain amount of games/seasons to be eligible for this.

Present day hockey players have it much better than those who grew up playing prior to the 90's. They're still miles behind the states, at least there is something for them after hockey.

Hockey players in the 7o's and 80's often became salesmen. The company who hired them figured their hockey fame could help boost sales.

Hockey Canada is now forcing young players (in jr such as the Q, WHL, OHL, etc...) to do some schooling. I believe they are required to go to school until they are drafted by an NHL team.

I don't know the specifics (can't remember), but from what I remember, jr players have a pretty full schedule with hockey and school.

Even though they are doing this, this is still a gray area. Those who are drafted by NHL and for one reason or another their careers are cut short (either they don't pan out or due to injury), fall into another group. They cut their educations short since and NHL team drafted them, but if they don't play a certain number of games they don't qualify for the players fund and since they no longer play jr, they can benefit from the jr payment plan. Imo that's why we see so many career AHLers. May not be NHL salaries, but it's still a living.

Young Canadian hockey players have it better than those who played prior to the 90's. But still have a ways to go before they catch up to the states. Many Canadian players are going to school in the states to have something to fall back on. It's unfortunate cos we're losing a lot of young Canadian kids to the states due to their mandatory education.

And yes I agree with you, I'm sure a lot of hockey players who didn't make it and didn't take their education seriously (cos they thought they would be the next Gretzky) turn to drugs and alcohol.

I don't for one second believe substance abuse is only a problem x-NHL enforcers have to deal with. I think we'd be very surprised to know how many NHLers, x-NHLers, former jr stars (who didn;t pan out) and career AHLers have substance abuse problems.

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They want to work for a scholarship to a US college, all the power to them. They should stick around the 4 years if they get it and get that education. It's the other ones, that you mention, that make no sense to me. Their parents hold some accountability for sure too. You got to explain to your kids that sports isn't the be all and end all of life. Or, maybe that's just the educator in me and all anyone really needs is sports.

I just don't get it.

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As you know RDS, I read a lot. I read a book last year (don't ask me which one) in which they touched on this.

It's much better than it use to be, but it's no where near the states. Since American born players play at the college and university level, they are forced to take classes and pass if they want to continue to play hockey.

Hockey Canada has made strides to do something similar. Those kids who never make it to the NHL, do have a certain amount of money they receive to pay for schooling if they don't go into the NHL. This part is a lil foggy, but I also believe there's a players fund that will pay an x-NHLer some schooling if they choose to do so after their NHL careers, but I believe they are required to play a certain amount of games/seasons to be eligible for this.

Present day hockey players have it much better than those who grew up playing prior to the 90's. They're still miles behind the states, at least there is something for them after hockey.

Hockey players in the 7o's and 80's often became salesmen. The company who hired them figured their hockey fame could help boost sales.

Hockey Canada is now forcing young players (in jr such as the Q, WHL, OHL, etc...) to do some schooling. I believe they are required to go to school until they are drafted by an NHL team.

I don't know the specifics (can't remember), but from what I remember, jr players have a pretty full schedule with hockey and school.

Even though they are doing this, this is still a gray area. Those who are drafted by NHL and for one reason or another their careers are cut short (either they don't pan out or due to injury), fall into another group. They cut their educations short since and NHL team drafted them, but if they don't play a certain number of games they don't qualify for the players fund and since they no longer play jr, they can benefit from the jr payment plan. Imo that's why we see so many career AHLers. May not be NHL salaries, but it's still a living.

Young Canadian hockey players have it better than those who played prior to the 90's. But still have a ways to go before they catch up to the states. Many Canadian players are going to school in the states to have something to fall back on. It's unfortunate cos we're losing a lot of young Canadian kids to the states due to their mandatory education.

And yes I agree with you, I'm sure a lot of hockey players who didn't make it and didn't take their education seriously (cos they thought they would be the next Gretzky) turn to drugs and alcohol.

I don't for one second believe substance abuse is only a problem x-NHL enforcers have to deal with. I think we'd be very surprised to know how many NHLers, x-NHLers, former jr stars (who didn;t pan out) and career AHLers have substance abuse problems.

I haven't heard about the fund, but I do recall hearing about how the players in the OHL do have to go to school etc. The thing with that is it's basically high school, nothing beyond that. The AHL is good in the sense that some of these guys can make upward of 80 thousand a year. How long is an AHL career though, especially with the way the talent level keeps developing. It isn't the greatest place for a 30 odd year old with a family. I agree with you wholeheartedly that it isn't only the fighters who turn to drugs. In fact, I'm in line to believe that someone who was a star in junior and can't quite make the jump to the NHL for whatever reason would turn to alcohol/drug abuse first. Hockey Canada is years behind the States and that's a problem, considering we claim to be the most knowledgeable about hockey etc. One would have hoped that they would have developed a proper system by 2011.

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I have admittedly been a pretty big Cherry fan in the past, but he's even starting to get to me now. Obviously you have to take everything he says with a grain of salt and form your own opinions, but he's going too far nowadays. It's too bad because I think he really does have some good points on certain issues. He's been a big proponent of touch icing, soft-cap equipment, getting rid of the seamless glass, stanchion redesign, etc. In many ways he's been about changing things to make hockey safer while still allowing players to be as physical as they need to be, of which I am 100% in agreement.

That's why lately I don't understand his apparent hatred of how the NHL and Shanahan are handling head shots, boarding, and other reckless behavior. As long as good judgment is used, weeding out these garbage cheap shots and handing out stiff suspensions can only help the game. If done correctly (for the record, I think Shanny's judgment so far has been impeccable), the players should still feel as if they can still hit hard and play a very physical game - they just can't be too reckless or predatory about it, and they may have to re-learn and adjust a little how they hit.

that you can still crush a guy like Scott Stevens used to (contrary to Cherry's Scott Stevens montage last week when he said you'd never see hits like that again), yet still do it cleanly and without attempting to injure a guy (I have no idea how Don thinks that was a head shot). I just don't understand why Cherry is so against this.
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So the Globe and mail think it's okay for Grapes to express his opinions,I would fight to the death for anybody to be able to state what they feel.What I do object to is having to pay to have his opinions shoved down my throat,I feel he is out of touch with reality,he stated that baseball players do not complain about head hits,I am sure they do, but baseball has nothing to do with hockey,let baseball police itself.

What the NHL is doing is right,it's taking care of it's players and not before time,the fact that ex enforcers think that fighting and bad hit's are not the way the game should be played now,prove that this is the right way to go,they have been there and done that,and suffered the consequences,so please CBC shut the senile old man up and let us have a knowledgeable analyst give their opinions,on today's game.

GO HABS GO :lol: :lol:

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I have admittedly been a pretty big Cherry fan in the past, but he's even starting to get to me now. Obviously you have to take everything he says with a grain of salt and form your own opinions, but he's going too far nowadays. It's too bad because I think he really does have some good points on certain issues.

Same here...I'm kinda thinking the same as you lately..............but,won't lie....will still tune into coaches corner,just for the hell of it.

He just needs to stop being such a loudmouth

Never will happen....its just his way.<_<

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It's time to muzzle this old dinosaur.

Tone it down there :angry:....or we'll open another law-suit...

:lol:

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That Dino comment may have been over the line. Wouldn't want to offend any Barney's out there. :P :P

lol

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Whats sad is his video evidence of why big hitting is needed. He used headshots on Kariya and Lindros courtesy of Scott Stevens. Both these hits contributed to further concussion issues that ruined careers (Kariya apparently has brain damage or risk of). According to an article on Bleacher report, Cherry once ranted about a head shot to Guy Lafleur in a world championship, said it was a dirty hit and the guy only wanted to make a claim to fame, that the hit should not be condoned etc.

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Tonight, should be interesting.

:lol: Just coming on to post that.

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From the heart :rolleyes:

:lol:

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Looks like it was a case of apologize or walk tonight. Anybody actually buy that baloney??? And he called them hypocrites. :lol:

Guarantee CBC told him their thinking of another 7 second delay or whatever to edit out what he rants about, and the impending lawsuit, caused him to cave.

If I were the players I wouldn't accept just an on air apology. I'd want one directly to my face.

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