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BigTed3

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Sure, if you compare Toronto to a team like Carolina or Phoenix, Toronto wins hands down.

That's harsh on Carolina lol, RBC is louder than the ACC a lot of the time

Nice blog HTL, I hate the Bruins more than the Leafs so you hit the nail on the head on that point, I imagine t being fun in a weird way living in the GTA or Southern Ont.

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Thanks again everyone. ;)

That's harsh on Carolina lol, RBC is louder than the ACC a lot of the time

Nice blog HTL, I hate the Bruins more than the Leafs so you hit the nail on the head on that point, I imagine t being fun in a weird way living in the GTA or Southern Ont.

Well,,,it has been more then tolerable the last few years down here. :P :P

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That's harsh on Carolina lol, RBC is louder than the ACC a lot of the time

Nice blog HTL, I hate the Bruins more than the Leafs so you hit the nail on the head on that point, I imagine t being fun in a weird way living in the GTA or Southern Ont.

Ya, dissing leaf fans is fun.

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Thanks again everyone. ;)

Well,,,it has been more then tolerable the last few years down here. :P :P

Try being married to someone who's family lives in leaf country... I was afraid I'd have to sleep in the car the nights the habs won.

By the way, she's my x-wife. :P

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Stay tuned this weekend for a piece by Kinot about a special Habs souvenir.

We are still looking for additional writers to share thoughts or stories with us over the next several weeks. Do you have a favorite Habs' memory? Do you have a story about why your favorite player is your favorite player? Do you have any thoughts on something going on with the Habs' right now? Or come up with your own idea! Send me a short piece about it and drop me a PM so we can feature you right here in this space.

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I look forward to reading it kinot! :)

You mean I'm up next? :blink::unsure:

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To submit a blog on your topic of choice, just drop me a PM.

Today's entry comes from Kinot-1, who tells us about a special Habs souvenir and the story behind it.

Cheers,

Big Ted,

on behalf of the moderating team

Blog #6: The Card by Kinot-1

Back in the early nineties, when my youngest daughter Jen was about 15 or 16, there was an ad in the paper announcing a Habs Old-timers game would be played at the local arena. The Habs Old-timers were to play against a team made up of local firemen and policemen. The ad stated that many well-known former Habs would be there, but the one name that caught my eye was Rocket Richard, who would referee the first period. I couldn't believe my good fortune at having the Great One come to London, and I would get to see him in person, and on skates.

Now, Jen, at the time, had never watched a Habs game with me, except when she was small and sitting on my lap (maybe that's why she didn't watch hockey with me... I was too loud cheering). So, when I mentioned that the Habs Old-timers were coming to play in London in a few weeks, I was more than a little surprised to have her ask me if she could go with me. Of course I said that we could, even though she had school the next day.

After getting the tickets, we filed into the arena. One by one the former Habs were announced to the crowd, who applauded each one: Mark Napier, Steve Shutt, Murray Wilson, Yvon Lambert, Guy Lapointe, and many others that I can't recall. Finally my wait was over. The Rocket appeared in his striped shirt and was given a standing ovation. I just stared and clapped, for here was the man I grew up idolizing.

The game began and my eyes were everywhere, but I especially watched the Rocket. Here we were, watching the same players that I had seen on tv and who had won many cups. I was so excited, and even though I had already been to two regular season games involving the Habs, it was like watching a game seven final with your favorite players.

Jen was more reserved than I. Dare I say she was quiet? At home she was used to me yelling and screaming at the tv in the rec-room, but now... I was in my element: every rush, play, and goal was cheered.

At a stoppage in play, it was announced that the Rocket would be signing autograghs at intermission, and Jen said that she would go and try to get one. By the time we got to the line-up, there must have been thirty to forty people in front of us. She suggested that I go back and watch the game and she would stay. When I returned, she was about five or six people back. I then suggested that she say "Merci" after she received the autographed card, but she said that she couldn't. Finally, it was our turn. Here we were, standing not three feet away from this hockey icon, who to me, was the greatest hockey player ever. He took the card and signed it and gave it to Jen. She said thank you, and we left with the autographed card. It was over all too soon. The rest of the game was a blur, as all I could think of, was seeing the most famous Hab of all time in person and having his signature on that card.

Since then, I have been to three more Habs games (at the Forum, the Bell, and the ACC) and seen the Stanley Cup twice. However, nothing beat this one memory of Jen (who never willingly sat down with her dad and watched a game) going to the game with me, standing in line for over twenty minutes, and getting the best gift of all for her dad.

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It sounds like a beautiful evening for you kinot, one you will always remember & have a big smile on your face when you do. Thank you for sharing it with us.

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Wow Knot! Lucky, you must have been really happy!

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I never got to meet the Rocket in person, but I will always remember the night they closed The Forum and the ovation he got the. Truly one of the greats in the game and a well-deserved moment for him.

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Super story Kinot. I had the privilege of meeting the true great one ( Rocket). It was in an autograph line in T.O. Not only did he take the time to sign a great autograph ( unlike a lot of the scratch marks we see from players today)but he took the time to greet everybody as they came up. His security people actually had to step in a few times to move him along at a quicker pace. If he got into a conversation with you ,it was like you were a long lost relative that he needed to catch up with. Great man.

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Thanks everyone for your kind words. It is a memory I will never forget. :)

The card is in my night-table. :D

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Thanks everyone for your kind words. It is a memory I will never forget. :)

The card is in my night-table. :D

I loved reading this blog Kinot. A lot of people end up disappointed after meeting their hero, in this instance you are obviously not. And to boot you have a great family memory shared with you and your daughter, brilliant. Thank you for sharing. :)

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Kinot:

The two times I got to meet the Rocket and talk hockey were the two best days of my life. Along for the ride were Henri Richard (first time) and Jean Beliveau (second time). So I consider myself four times blessed. The world was a much better place with the Rocket in it.

I feel badly for any hockey fan who never got the chance to spend even a minute with the Rocket. But I hope we are all united in our love for the Canadiens and the legacy of excellence Richard gave us.

To me, he was every bit as advertised.

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Thanks everyone for your kind words. It is a memory I will never forget. :)

The card is in my night-table. :D

Awesome memory for you Kinot! :)

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A little perspective from Winnipeg on the events of the past summer.

Please send your blogs, stories, or opinions to me via PM so we can feature you in the next few weeks.

Big Ted

Blog #7: Life and The Game by WinnipegJet

A new NHL season; something we’ve (perhaps impatiently) waited for since the last seconds ticked off the clock of Game 7 in Vancouver back in the spring. A new season brings new hope and excitement to both players and fans. Organizations are keen to see the results of summer development and acquisitions, hoping that they’ll take that next step forward in their pursuit of hockey’s Holy Grail. Fans are excited to see the teams they bleed their hearts out for back on the ice, as for many hockey fans, the game is truly a passion. For players, this is their livelihood; many of them are living their dreams on a daily basis.

However, THIS new season perhaps brings with it something new: an opportunity to unite and to heal.

The summer of 2011 has undoubtedly been one of the most tragic times the league - and the game of hockey as a whole - has ever seen. The impact of this really hit me last Tuesday night at the Winnipeg Jets preseason opener when the night opened with an NHL-produced tribute to those lost this summer. For those that have yet to see the video, please look for this. I strongly suggest taking the time to watch it and reflect.

I think as fans we are sometimes shielded from the true tragedy of these events. We view the game and these players as something on a different level, and while we feel a great emotional connection to the game and our favourite teams, we may sometimes overlook the human aspect of all of it. In reality, each man who died this summer – from the tragic events in Yaroslav to the sudden deaths here on home soil – is very much not unlike you and I. While we immortalize so much of the game we love, we lose sight of the fact that the game itself is carried out by mortal men. Men with families and friends, and men that struggle through personal problems as millions of others do world-wide.

It is understandable that for some of us, the game of hockey acts as an ‘escape’ of sorts from the real world. I have certainly been guilty of this in the past, as I know many of you likely have been as well. However, let us at the same time not lose sight of the important things happening around us in the world and in our lives. Let us use this new NHL season as a time to evaluate the personal lives of ourselves, our families, our friends, and loved ones. Let us not turn a blind eye to the struggles we see (and often don’t see) people undertaking in society; instead, let us use this as a time to heal and help heal and to make true progress in battling issues like depression and addiction. And finally, let us not take life for granted; instead, let us use this time to unite and love those around us and to truly live life to its fullest. It is difficult to understand the true value of life until you see it vanish in an instant, much as the thousands of friends and families affected by the sudden and tragic events of the summer.

May we remember and honour those lost not only in hockey but in our own lives as well, and use that memory to help make the lives and our world a better place.

Happy new NHL season, everyone.

-- WinnipegJet

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A little perspective from Winnipeg on the events of the past summer.

Please send your blogs, stories, or opinions to me via PM so we can feature you in the next few weeks.

Big Ted

Blog #7: Life and The Game by WinnipegJet

A new NHL season; something we’ve (perhaps impatiently) waited for since the last seconds ticked off the clock of Game 7 in Vancouver back in the spring. A new season brings new hope and excitement to both players and fans. Organizations are keen to see the results of summer development and acquisitions, hoping that they’ll take that next step forward in their pursuit of hockey’s Holy Grail. Fans are excited to see the teams they bleed their hearts out for back on the ice, as for many hockey fans, the game is truly a passion. For players, this is their livelihood; many of them are living their dreams on a daily basis.

However, THIS new season perhaps brings with it something new: an opportunity to unite and to heal.

The summer of 2011 has undoubtedly been one of the most tragic times the league - and the game of hockey as a whole - has ever seen. The impact of this really hit me last Tuesday night at the Winnipeg Jets preseason opener when the night opened with an NHL-produced tribute to those lost this summer. For those that have yet to see the video, please look for this. I strongly suggest taking the time to watch it and reflect.

I think as fans we are sometimes shielded from the true tragedy of these events. We view the game and these players as something on a different level, and while we feel a great emotional connection to the game and our favourite teams, we may sometimes overlook the human aspect of all of it. In reality, each man who died this summer – from the tragic events in Yaroslav to the sudden deaths here on home soil – is very much not unlike you and I. While we immortalize so much of the game we love, we lose sight of the fact that the game itself is carried out by mortal men. Men with families and friends, and men that struggle through personal problems as millions of others do world-wide.

It is understandable that for some of us, the game of hockey acts as an ‘escape’ of sorts from the real world. I have certainly been guilty of this in the past, as I know many of you likely have been as well. However, let us at the same time not lose sight of the important things happening around us in the world and in our lives. Let us use this new NHL season as a time to evaluate the personal lives of ourselves, our families, our friends, and loved ones. Let us not turn a blind eye to the struggles we see (and often don’t see) people undertaking in society; instead, let us use this as a time to heal and help heal and to make true progress in battling issues like depression and addiction. And finally, let us not take life for granted; instead, let us use this time to unite and love those around us and to truly live life to its fullest. It is difficult to understand the true value of life until you see it vanish in an instant, much as the thousands of friends and families affected by the sudden and tragic events of the summer.

May we remember and honour those lost not only in hockey but in our own lives as well, and use that memory to help make the lives and our world a better place.

Happy new NHL season, everyone.

-- WinnipegJet

That is a great blog/post Jet. All of us have to remember that this is just a game, played by people just like us. Life is fragile, we never know what our future holds, or how long it will be. Love everyone you meet - do unto others as you would have done to you!

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Thanks, folks.

I also forgot to actually send BigTed the link to the video. For those who haven't seen it, here it is:

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Thanks WJ,,,,a very moving and thoughtfull blog, that we should all relfect on.

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