Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

GreekHockeyCoach

Wood or composite sticks

   7 members have voted

  1. 1. Should youth hockey organizations use wood sticks for players under 12 to level the playing field for those that can't afford composite


Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

15 posts in this topic

Should youth hockey organizations force players under the age of 12 to use wood hockey sticks in order to level the playing field for those families that can't afford the high end composite sticks.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's an interesting question. I don't think they should be FORCED to use wood hockey sticks. Maybe a better approach would be that their Leagues be forced to fundraise enough money to provide the sticks for all players at the cost of wooden ones. That's IF they're serious about providing equal opportunities for underprivileged families.

Of course my opinion is based on playing with wooden sticks being considered a huge disadvantage for a team. I don't know at what age it becomes a factor.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In order to be more cost friendly, Id rather they use wood sticks. My local OHL team lets timbits kids play during intermissions and I always thought it was weird seeing kids out there with 300 dollar reebok composite sticks. They have to cut the stick in half, I'd never do that for my kids...when I have kids. At a young age it just makes sense to go with wooden sticks, that way if your kid isn't all that into hockey, you didn't fork out a few hundred bucks on sticks that are undersized now.

As for NHL, Im not really sure. I like the look of composite, but wooden sticks have that classic element to it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woods sticks can't perform as well as the composite sticks, that's a given. My view is that if the technology is out there, then use it. My only pet peeve is that the companies that make the composite sticks are spending way too much money on advertising and that's driven the price of the sticks through the roof. Despite that, people are still buying and therefore we won't see the price coming down any time soon.

Having played with wood sticks growing up, I prefer the feel and playability of the composites.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for those families that can't afford the high end composite sticks.

I do feel for those who are cash stricken such in this case coach (as all hockey equipment)....cause its the kids (some) that no fault to them...are left out because of.

Like HTL says,its sure an interesting question either way.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's an interesting question. I don't think they should be FORCED to use wood hockey sticks. Maybe a better approach would be that their Leagues be forced to fundraise enough money to provide the sticks for all players at the cost of wooden ones. That's IF they're serious about providing equal opportunities for underprivileged families.

Of course my opinion is based on playing with wooden sticks being considered a huge disadvantage for a team. I don't know at what age it becomes a factor.

It's a factor at any age due to the different flex types that composite sticks offer. The flex causes the stick to create a whip effect thus causing the puck to travel at a higher velocity. I've seen kids as young as 4 years old being able to hit top corners because of the lightness and flex of the composite stick.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen kids as young as 4 years old being able to hit top corners because of the lightness and flex of the composite stick.

wow

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a factor at any age due to the different flex types that composite sticks offer. The flex causes the stick to create a whip effect thus causing the puck to travel at a higher velocity. I've seen kids as young as 4 years old being able to hit top corners because of the lightness and flex of the composite stick.

If that's the case Coach ( and i wouldn't know as i've never used one),, then it sounds like it's an important developmental tool that should be taken advantage of as early as possible.

As you said,,,the technology is there to be used. Leagues need to figure out a way to level the playing field for ALL their players,,, equipment wise.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leagues need to figure out a way to level the playing field for ALL their players,,, equipment wise.

for sure

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a factor at any age due to the different flex types that composite sticks offer. The flex causes the stick to create a whip effect thus causing the puck to travel at a higher velocity. I've seen kids as young as 4 years old being able to hit top corners because of the lightness and flex of the composite stick.

Which is precisely the reason goalies now wear larger equipment, to protect themselves.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being an x-tender... I prefer the wood sticks. :D

Use to be you needed strong wrists to be able to take a good wrist shot, now you just need weight on your stick.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Woods sticks can't perform as well as the composite sticks, that's a given. My view is that if the technology is out there, then use it. My only pet peeve is that the companies that make the composite sticks are spending way too much money on advertising and that's driven the price of the sticks through the roof. Despite that, people are still buying and therefore we won't see the price coming down any time soon.

Having played with wood sticks growing up, I prefer the feel and playability of the composites.

I'd agree with you on this. It's unfortunate that some families and children would not be able to afford them, but I personally believe if a family wants to blow big money on top-end equipment for their kid, that's ultimately their prerogative. Not everything in life is 'fair' its just one of those things we have to live with.

I also agree on how the sticks are overpriced, but I guess it just shows how economics works with price elasticity and such. You hit it right on the head; as long as people are willing to pay, the companies will have no need to lower prices.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I say no I know many parents that can afford them that don't buy them as kids tend to outgrow them before they ever break them. My kids all have them not because I feel they are better or worse just a personal choice I have made as a parent.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just dont understand why people spend so much money for these things when their child plays timbits hockey. I saw kids walking around after a local OHL game (timbits are allowed on during intermission) and they had nice RBK sticks ,etc. All cut down to their size. IMO its a major waste of money :blink:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is somewhat akin to the issue of using aluminum vs. wooden bats in baseball. The difference is that in the pros, aluminum bats are not allowed, so players eventually have to make the switch if they want to pursue the sport as a career. In the NHL, players are allowed to use their choice of stick and if the composite ones perform better, it would be a disadvantage not to use one. That said, if a kid can master the game with a wooden stick, transitioning to a composite one shouldn't be hard and it may actually be better for the kid's skill development to learn how to play with a stick that does less work for him or her. To me, the bottom line is that the game should be about fun when you're 5 or 6 or even when you're 12 or 14. Most kids are not going to play on a stream towards the NHL, so they may as well just be allowed to use whatever they want and do the best they can with what they can afford. It would be nice to supply everyone with the same equipment but it's just not a reality and frankly, if a team came to me to fundraise and I knew it was because they wanted to invest in $300 sticks I would say no. Maybe I'm behind the times in that regard because those sticks were not in use when I played, but I think there are other priorities in life than having a composite stick, especially when it can break or needs to be changed every year as a kid is growing. Hockey is expensive enough as a sport that I don't see composite sticks as being a necessity.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.