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Plane carrying KHL team crashes


Shawn1990

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I've only just been told the news by a colleague who knows I'm a hockey fan. Read the one article on NHL.com

Stunned and saddened.

Any loss of life on this scale is sad, but when it affects one particular collection of people, sport and names you have followed and know, it just makes it that much more shocking. Even today, The Busby Babes (the Manchester United team lost in a plane crash in February '58 that maddienmike referred to) are still remembered. These guys will be remembered by all hockey fans, too.

My heart goes out to all those affected by this horrible event.

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Doesn't it seem like this whole summer was so sad for hockey? Condolences to all those who lost loved ones in the plane crash in Russia, as well as those players we lost over the summer.

Like most have said, this is a terrible tragedy for all the families involved. I think it must also be a shock for some of the North American players like Brent Sopel who are about to start their first season in Russia and must really be asking themselves whether going over there is worth it to them. All else aside, this has been a terrible summer for the NHL but I think it's important to realize that there are tragedies like this that happen in the world more often than we think and people who are taking their own lives or suffering from depression who are not NHL/KHL players. The fact that these are professional hockey players brings this to greater media attention, but there have been equally devastating events affecting people everywhere, and I think it's important to recall that as well.

A great, big, warm and hearty hug and amen to you, BigTed3. You could not be more right.

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Like most have said, this is a terrible tragedy for all the families involved. I think it must also be a shock for some of the North American players like Brent Sopel who are about to start their first season in Russia and must really be asking themselves whether going over there is worth it to them. All else aside, this has been a terrible summer for the NHL but I think it's important to realize that there are tragedies like this that happen in the world more often than we think and people who are taking their own lives or suffering from depression who are not NHL/KHL players. The fact that these are professional hockey players brings this to greater media attention, but there have been equally devastating events affecting people everywhere, and I think it's important to recall that as well.

Yes I agree with you BigTed but this is not the only tragedy in the world today,there are thousands of children dying all over the world,from abuse sickness starvation and war,and we don't see all this love and care for them.I too am guilty of not seeing them at times,but it's too often true that our society is selfish and insulated, I am afraid it's too often a case of "out of sight out of mind",so I think it's about time the world reminded itself,that there are millions out there who need our love and care,perhaps it's time for another LIVE AID or something to remind us how lucky we are.

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Terrible tragedy that could've been avoided.

Was listening to Team 990 on my way into work and they were discussing th crash and Russia's scary air service.

One thing they said that struck me was, apparently the plane that was carrying the team is banned from flying over Europe. Yet they use these planes regularly.

I feel so bad for the families, what's even worse is that it could've been avoided.

After the crash, players may think twice before heading overseas.

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Absolutly tragic. RIP.

To be horribly honest, I HATE flying. The most comforting thing I can generally think of, is that -hey, professional sport teams fly nearly every day and you NEVER hear of anything going wrong. There goes that safety thought.

Statistically, flying is many times safer than driving. Also, flying regulations in North America and Europe are much, much better than those in Russia.

http://www.anxieties.com/flying-howsafe.php

Again, this incident was just awful, hearing about Pavol Demitra being on that plane really rattled me for the rest of the day..

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Of course the resident KHL fanatic has to comment on this...

I heard about this the day it happened, first thing after waking up and sitting down to check news before going to work. I cried most of the way there.

Then cried again after the news that the survivor died after surgery.

This is so horrible... my heart goes out to all the families, I wish I could give them all a hug. :(

This was to be quite a powerhouse team...

The KHL has announced that the Opening Cup (first game of the season, played between last season's Gagarin Cup finalists) has been renamed Lokomotiv Cup in memory of the team.

The season start has been pushed back to September 12 - which is also when a meeting will take place between league and team officials, fans, and Russian President Medvedev (not the same guy as KHL chairman Medvedev!) to determine the future of the team.

18 KHL teams have agreed to give Loko 2 or 3 players (including top-10 type players) to fill the roster with.

The memorial in Minsk was beautiful, I liked the gesture of Dynamo putting the puck into their own net to give Lokomotiv a symbolic win. And unlike someone else mentioned I didn't mind Lukashenka being there - politics is irrelevant here, a lot of people died, and he's as big a hockey fan as any of us here are.

Regarding the airplane - I see a lot of immediate blame being thrown on the airplane by western media. But that's not it, that's just an easy excuse. I've flown a lot - including quite a bit on Russian-made aircraft, and the only misadventure I've had was an aborted takeoff... and that happened on an American-built airplane.

Here's tidbits I haven't seen mentioned on any Canadian news:

1. The airplane, a Yak-42, was built in 1993 and had just been for a major inspection in August, which it passed. During this inspection, one of the three engines was replaced.

2. It was the airline, Yak-Service, that was banned from flying into the EU, not the aircraft.

3. This is probably the most important bit: the airfield at Yaroslavl is rather small, with the runway being designed for the older, smaller Tu-134 airliner. The Yak-42 needs a longer take-off run than the Tu-134, so operation of the type from Yaroslavl needs extra care and skill.

The takeoff run was longer than usual, with the aircraft running off the end of the runway before lifting off the ground - and flying straight into an antenna tower 450 m from the end of the runway. A security camera on the tower recorded the airplane rolling off the runway at speed, lifting off after going off the tarmac and crashing into the tower.

So if there is someone to blame, it is the pilot.

4. The previous coach of Lokomotiv (a Czech guy) said that he never felt there was anything wrong with the airplane, seemed to him always to be in good order, and never felt unsafe aboard it.

5. Preliminary analysis of the flight recorder shows that there was no evidence of substandard fuel, trim and flaps were set for take-off, and engines were functioning until the collision with the tower. The investigators are saying most likely cause is pilot error, or perhaps a technical malfunction...

But the biggest question to me and others is: the pilots were both experienced, with thousands of hours. If they saw that the takeoff run was getting too long - and they had to know this given everything else we know - why did they not abort, why did they try to continue the takeoff?

It makes me wonder about NHL, NFL, NBA teams... most sports charter airlines fly old Boeing 727s, the very last of which were built in 1982. They're probably exquisitely maintained, but the airframes are 30+ years old. Some will say there is no such thing as 'too old' for an airplane, the relevant factor is maintenance, just look at all the WW2 era airplanes still flying in airshows and whatnot - but then don't forget, too, that one of those crashed recently, too, despite being exquisitely maintained.

What a horrible, horrible off season.

I hope at the very least those NHL teams who had former players aboard will hold a memorial silence at their opening game... but even better would be such a moment of silence at every home opener in the NHL.

I heard - but not confirmed - that the Lokomotiv Cup game to start the season between Atlant and Salavat will be played without any music during the intermissions. BTW, the opening game was being played when the plane crashed, and when the news came in, the teams and officials agreed to abort the game.

I can't wait for the games - NHL and KHL - to start, and I hope both will have exceptional seasons of great hockey to make up for all the sadness of summer 2011... omg I'm ready to start crying again after thinking about this this much to write this post...

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Good analysis post of the situation. However there are minimum speeds that decisions must be made at and unfortunately the pilot may have waited too long for there to be a safe stop for the aircraft.

Also, U.S. and Canadian aviation standards are much more stringent than Russia's. Now while this does not make everything "safe" it does make the risk a lot lower for those using the services.

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Good analysis post of the situation. However there are minimum speeds that decisions must be made at and unfortunately the pilot may have waited too long for there to be a safe stop for the aircraft.

That's my thinking too. But, I can't but think that there /had/ to have been some indication of a problem?

Making it more puzzling is that the black box (reportedly) doesn't indicate any engine problem until the collision. Which leads to an alternate theory: the pilots themselves botched it, not accelerating fast/hard enough during the takeoff run... which'd make it /entirely/ pilot error.

Also, U.S. and Canadian aviation standards are much more stringent than Russia's. Now while this does not make everything "safe" it does make the risk a lot lower for those using the services.

True. Russian civil aviation standards for domestic airlines are significantly laxer than elsewhere (though by necessity the 'big' airlines that fly internationally to EU and North America are up to Western standards...

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