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When Do You Think The Lockout Will End


kinot-1
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31 members have voted

  1. 1. Well,,What Do You Think It Will End?

    • Nov. 1st?
      1
    • Dec. 1st?
      6
    • Jan. 1st.?
      7
    • Season is lost?
      16
    • Other
      1


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Also, forgot to mention that I think we'll be back just in time for the Winter Classic, I think there'll probably be some outside pressure from NBC to get a deal done.

Who wants to watch the winter classic anyway? Its over they walked away again. I want to watch hockey (NHL) but it might be done! Pay them some more money (players) so the fans will have to pay 700.00 per seat. I think hockey will put themselves out of business.

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Gretzky shared his 2 cents and feels we should have hockey by January 1st. He is very involved in the NHL, but don't think he has much ties to the CBA.

His guess is probably as good as ours.

Everyone is betting on Jan 1st, but the closer we get to that date, the more the NHLPA is going to use that as leverage knowing the owners want to save the game. There's been talk the league may just cancel the game well ahead of time to prevent that scenario and show they're playing hardball, so I'm not overly confident the lockout will be done by then. If anything, the owners of less successful teams will be willing to wait out the nfl and college football seasons (when they have more competition for sports fans' attention) and try to force a shorter NHL season with higher revenues per game.

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Everyone is betting on Jan 1st, but the closer we get to that date, the more the NHLPA is going to use that as leverage knowing the owners want to save the game. There's been talk the league may just cancel the game well ahead of time to prevent that scenario and show they're playing hardball, so I'm not overly confident the lockout will be done by then. If anything, the owners of less successful teams will be willing to wait out the nfl and college football seasons (when they have more competition for sports fans' attention) and try to force a shorter NHL season with higher revenues per game.

Good point, those in places like Dallas where they already have major franchises aren't really losing too much now(Baseball, football and basketball are the top runners). But when football is over, baseball is soon-ish, sports fans (I said sports fans, not hockey fans), may be lured to an NHL game.

Still, I don't see them making back the money lost even if they charge double. I doubt they'd even get close to double. In the dead of winter (February), places like Dallas, Phoenix, etc... have trouble giving the tickets away. Florida teams always have the snow birds, they're better off in that regard.

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I've always been a big CFL fan, and this NHL lockout is reconfirming to me why I prefer to watch Canadian football played by ordinary guys who aren't millionaires. It's a fan-friendly, accessible, affordable league. Sure, the best players are in the NFL, but frankly, I don't care. CFL football is unique to Canada, and I can honestly cheer for the players who put their bodies on the line playing a brutal sport without the ridiculous compensation of millions of dollars.

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Guest habs1952

I've always been a big CFL fan, and this NHL lockout is reconfirming to me why I prefer to watch Canadian football played by ordinary guys who aren't millionaires. It's a fan-friendly, accessible, affordable league. Sure, the best players are in the NFL, but frankly, I don't care. CFL football is unique to Canada, and I can honestly cheer for the players who put their bodies on the line playing a brutal sport without the ridiculous compensation of millions of dollars.

The CFL is an all-round better game too!

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I've always been a big CFL fan, and this NHL lockout is reconfirming to me why I prefer to watch Canadian football played by ordinary guys who aren't millionaires. It's a fan-friendly, accessible, affordable league. Sure, the best players are in the NFL, but frankly, I don't care. CFL football is unique to Canada, and I can honestly cheer for the players who put their bodies on the line playing a brutal sport without the ridiculous compensation of millions of dollars.

Nice to hear Weeps. Habs1952 & myself are big time followers as well.

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Guest archey

"Football combines the two worst features of American life. It is violence punctuated by committee meetings."

- George Will

and nobody cross trains using football. :P

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I'm a big CFL fan, and I'm a casual NFL fan. I'd wager that I'm going to become more than a casual NFL fan the longer this lockout goes on, and there's only so much money I can spend on sports. Hockey will always be my favourite sport, but it's getting hard to be an NHL fan. I'm a Habs fan, but outside of the playoffs I find it hard to watch a random NHL game on TV. Not true for the CFL or NFL. I can watch any game that isn't a total blowout and enjoy myself (especially for the CFL). Don't get me wring, hockey's still my favourite live sport, and the Habs will always be my favourite sports team, but it's getting harder and harder to invest so much time watching and following the NHL when there's a big low-hanging fruit called the NFL.

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Guest habs1952

I'm not a football fan at all , I watch the Alouettes because they're a generally winning local team but I cant say I enjoy watching that sport <_<

Women only watch football for the 'buns'.

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I don't see it going into the new year. Teams like the leafs, rags and habs could hold out forever. But teams already on the verge of bankruptcy, I don't see them being able to hold out.

I agree, although I think its the middle of the road teams that will push for faster resolution. The Habs & Leafs (as mentioned) could hold out forever - and the real poor teams WILL hold out forever because they want the bleeding stopped. Its the middle of the road teams - those making minor loses/break even/minor profits that really would benefit an early puck drop.

Thankfully that is the balance (roughly 20) of the league, so hopefully saner minds will prevail & soon.

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I agree, although I think its the middle of the road teams that will push for faster resolution. The Habs & Leafs (as mentioned) could hold out forever - and the real poor teams WILL hold out forever because they want the bleeding stopped. Its the middle of the road teams - those making minor loses/break even/minor profits that really would benefit an early puck drop.

Thankfully that is the balance (roughly 20) of the league, so hopefully saner minds will prevail & soon.

It's tough to define each team's needs based on their class. I agree that the lower third of the league would seem more likely to be likely to hold out longer, not only because they need more money back from the players but because they aren't losing as much by not having games. In fact, they could be saving money. In places like Phoenix it's more profitable right now to not have games than to have them.

I'd guess the team's like Montreal, New York and Toronto want to get the ball rolling more than anyone because as much as they can withhold no games, they're the one's losing the most money because they actually make significant money.

From the sounds of things the hardliners are the usual suspects, led by Snider in Philly and Jacobs in Boston. This is more about lining their pockets and just paying less than it is about helping the small market teams. If it was about the smaller markets, the NHL would be more interested in a legitimate revenue sharing system than they appear to be. If I were the PA, I'd take a hard line stance and say any % you take away from us, goes into a pool for revenue sharing. If our share goes from 57% to 52%, that 5% is all distributed among the the teams that are in trouble. It may seem like the same end result, they lose the money but it would avoid having to go through this again in a few years because otherwise all that we're going to see is the rich teams making more profit and the lower tier teams still hurting. The NHL has a severely flawed system and the only way to truly fix it is to share significant amounts of money.

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