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For anyone that is interested, the explanation video for the Byfuglien supplemental discipline call released by the department of player safety is up.

Basically the explanation was ...

- Initial contact is in the hands, causing Gallagher to spin around.

- Elbow was tucked at the moment of impact.

- Gallagher was looking at the puck and reacted poorly.

- Byfuglien was aware of Gallagher and the puck and was bracing for impact.

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For anyone that is interested, the explanation video for the Byfuglien supplemental discipline call released by the department of player safety is up.

Basically the explanation was ...

- Initial contact is in the hands, causing Gallagher to spin around.

- Elbow was tucked at the moment of impact.

- Gallagher was looking at the puck and reacted poorly.

- Byfuglien was aware of Gallagher and the puck and was bracing for impact.

So, blame the victim, goons have to be allowed to be goons, and take any possible route to leave head hits in the game despite the overwhelming scientific evidence of their hazards.

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For anyone that is interested, the explanation video for the Byfuglien supplemental discipline call released by the department of player safety is up.

Basically the explanation was ...

- Initial contact is in the hands, causing Gallagher to spin around.

- Elbow was tucked at the moment of impact.

- Gallagher was looking at the puck and reacted poorly.

- Byfuglien was aware of Gallagher and the puck and was bracing for impact.

A brick wall was bracing for impact? :huh::blink:

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I'm just passing the information, don't hurt me! :(

Personally, I don't believe it was a head shot (at least according to league definition), but I do feel that if your arm extends in any manner through a check that it should be read as intent to injure. There was definitely an intent to throw a "chicken wing" maneuver in this case.

I've always said it is dangerous to allow the use of the arms in a body check. It increases the risk of arm to head contact, allows for what equates to a shove or push on an off-balance player, and creates artificial momentum in favor of the player using their arms, meaning the player using his hands in order to play the puck is always in danger.

If you look at the McDavid injury as an example, it was a hand on his hip that threw him off balance and caused his injury.

But I'm going to stop there because I'll go into rant mode. :P

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I LOVE THIS TEAM!!!!!

I find myself shouting this after every game they play!

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Just some questions I've been thinking about;

Seeing that Weise is in a contract year,,,do you sign him ASAP, or do you wait an find out how he does over the year? He's young (27), can score, (is the scoring sustainable?), and loves it here.

Our PP (25% 3rd) and PK (89.8%, 2nd) are those stats sustainable?

Can Condon keep doing what he's been doing? Methinks he's the real deal,,,, as in a top back-up.

How long will is be before MT tinkers with the top 2 lines? (Pleks, and DD lines). My guess is as long as we don't have injuries.

How can the Chuckie line be fixed?

Does Semin get back in the line-up,,, if so,,,who comes out,,, and when?

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But even if he got 20-25 goals, he would be due for a raise. My guess would be (based on 20-25 goals),,, 3.25-3.6 Mil. over 3 years.

He could also stagnate for the rest of the season and we would have paid a premium for a 20 game window.

He's always been a 4th liner, fringe 3rd liner his whole career. Do we dish out that kind of money for what could amount as an anomaly?

I'd be weary.

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He could also stagnate for the rest of the season and we would have paid a premium for a 20 game window.

He's always been a 4th liner, fringe 3rd liner his whole career. Do we dish out that kind of money for what could amount as an anomaly?

I'd be weary.

I am a huge fan of Dale Weise. I think he's been a real net positive in his time here. But if Weise isn't willing to take a discount, I would not only not spend too much to resign him, I'd consider selling high. There's still teams out there that might be dazzled by his performance this season and what he's done in the playoffs recently and make an illogical trade. If we can fleece Calgary, Florida, or someone else, I'd go for it.

The kind of teams that hastily sign players like Weise to big contracts after hot seasons are bad teams that go nowhere. I don't want the Habs to be one of them.

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Just some questions I've been thinking about;

Seeing that Weise is in a contract year,,,do you sign him ASAP, or do you wait an find out how he does over the year? He's young (27), can score, (is the scoring sustainable?), and loves it here.

Our PP (25% 3rd) and PK (89.8%, 2nd) are those stats sustainable?

Can Condon keep doing what he's been doing? Methinks he's the real deal,,,, as in a top back-up.

How long will is be before MT tinkers with the top 2 lines? (Pleks, and DD lines). My guess is as long as we don't have injuries.

How can the Chuckie line be fixed?

Does Semin get back in the line-up,,, if so,,,who comes out,,, and when?

Weise has similar even strength statistics similar to Prust, with the main difference being Prust has slightly better possession stats, while Weise has a slightly better offensive differential. You could reasonably compare the 2 on that basis, and it's an accumulation of over 2000 even strength minutes for Weise, so it is more representative than a contract based solely on more recent statistics.

I would say 2-4 years at less than $2.5M is reasonable, but I would caution lower, as his numbers likely show at least some favorable variation that will prove to be unsustainable.

I would be willing to sign him now under those terms, but am concerned about overpaying.

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PP and PK numbers are each sustainable, but we have seen extended slumps on the PP frequently. I would be inclined to believe our PP will drop somewhat. Our PK is more sustainable, due in part to a solid goaltending combination in Price and Condon.

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Condon seems to have the frame and athleticism necessary to continue to be successful as a backup, and a quality coach and mentor to learn from, which can only help him improve.

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I don't see any changes in regards to Therrien's top 6 anytime soon. Given his treatment of the players on the Galchenyuk line, they will have a difficult time asserting themselves without being given an opportunity to do so.

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It's entirely possible that Semin won't see ice again until an injury. We already know Therrien is content to leave players out of the lineup for lengthy periods of time. Unless Byron, DSP, or Flynn make an error that clearly costs us a game, I don't see him scratching any of them. Scratching Eller or Galchenyuk is foolish. The rest of our forwards are pretty much immune to being a healthy scratch.

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Courtesy of Habsworld, written before the ruins game, but it's interesting just the same.

"Below are 15 stats and notes from Montreal’s first 15 games. All stats are as of games played through Thursday, November 5th.

1) The Canadiens currently have a +28 goal differential. The next best in the league is the Rangers (+13) while the second best in the division is Florida (+5). Last season, it took them until February 24th to hit that mark.

2) Montreal is scoring 3.67 goals per game. That’s an increase of over a goal per game from 2014-15 (2.61) and sits a full goal above the league average (2.66).

3) Despite the extra scoring, the defence has yet to join in on the fun. The blueline has combined for just four goals and no player has more than one.

4) There are just two teams that are in the top five in both special teams rankings, Montreal (25.0% PP, 3rd; 89.8% PK, 2nd) and the New York Islanders. The Canadiens are first in combined special teams percentage.

5) The Habs have eight players in the top-50 in league scoring. The next closest team, Dallas, has just four.

6) Among those eight players is Tomas Fleischmann, who has four goals and eleven points. It took him until early January to reach those marks in 2014-15.

7) Another of those eight players, Dale Weise is only two goals shy of equalling his career high total of ten, set last season in 79 games. His eight markers this year are nearly 26% of his career total goals scored.

8) The Fleischmann-Desharnais-Weise trio lead all NHL lines in goals scored as a unit with 13. (The sum of their individual goals is higher but that line has scored 13 times when all three are on the ice together.)

9) Among Montreal players who have taken at least an average of five faceoffs per game, Alex Galchenyuk has the best faceoff percentage at 52.5%. His percentages in previous seasons? 47.1, 33.3, and 42.8.

10) Brendan Gallagher leads the Eastern Conference in High-Danger Scoring Chances with 24 and is one short of the league lead (courtesy of war-on-ice). He was 7th in that category last season. (Weise is second with 15, for those wondering.)

11) Andrei Markov’s average ice time is down more than two full minutes per game (22:50) compared to last season (24:54). P.K. Subban has also seen his ATOI drop by two minutes from 26:12 to 24:12.

12) Subban has taken just five minor penalties through 15 games. He had eleven minors at this point in time last season. Speaking of penalties, the Habs have just one major, a Nathan Beaulieu fight. That puts them in a nine-way tie for the second fewest majors in the NHL; ten teams have one or fewer so far this season.

13) Montreal doesn’t just lead the league in good categories. They’ve been credited with 165 giveaways, at least 18 more than any other team. They also have a massive lead in faceoffs taken. The Canadiens have lined up for 970 draws; the next closest is Winnipeg at 887. That’s a lot of whistles.

14) The Habs have recorded a point in each of their first seven home games (6-0-1), which only ties for their eighth longest such streak. They have a long way to go though if they want to match their franchise record of 25 back in 1943-44.

15) This is the first time the Canadiens have won 12 of their first 15 games in regulation to start a season. They’ll try to build on that on Saturday night as they host the Boston Bruins.

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So we never really had to play Semin to improve the offence, just sign him. I would give Weise 3 years at a max of 3.5 if he scores about 20 to 25. This is going to create some good competition for the youth trying to make this team in the near future. I thought this goal scoring would have happenned last year. The good news is we still have quite a few players still in th process of developing their game.

The off season could be interesting, but at this point I can see Semin and Gilbert moving on either via trade or release (UFA). Salary wise the team is in good shape. I only see Eller as potentially being slightly overpaid at 4.5 next year depending on the rest of this year. But the fact Bergevin just re-signed him leads me to believe he will be with us for a while. Stability appears to be close at hand for this franchise personnel wise. Now e just need to keep the fast paced play.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I don't seem to be able to find the thread for retired Habs, so I'll put this here.

Longueuil will have a street named after Jean Beliveau. Long overdue if you ask me. Heck Gretzky had a street named after him in TO, and he never played there.

http://fans.canadiens.nhl.com/community/topic/28118-retired-canadiens/

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