Jump to content
The Official Site of the Montréal Canadiens
Canadiens de Montreal

Everything Else About The Habs


Guest habs1952
 Share

Recommended Posts

On this day in history, Dec. 2, 1995, Patrick Roy was trade to Colorado. :(

I watched that last game and thought for sure, after 5 goals, he would be pulled,,,, then after 6,,,, then it got ridiculous ,,,7 nope,,, 8 nope,,,,,,, FINALLY, afer 9 goals on 26 SOG, he was pulled mercilessly.

ICYMI ,here are the goals, Patricks reaction and the aftermath..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On this day in history, Dec. 2, 1995, Patrick Roy was trade to Colorado. :(

I watched that last game and thought for sure, after 5 goals, he would be pulled,,,, then after 6,,,, then it got ridiculous ,,,7 nope,,, 8 nope,,,,,,, FINALLY, afer 9 goals on 26 SOG, he was pulled mercilessly.

ICYMI ,here are the goals, Patricks reaction and the aftermath..

I still remember watching that game. I switched my allegiance to Colorado that day. While I had watched Montreal at a younger age, it was Roy's first season that really pulled me in. I was a Roy fan first and a Habs fan second. While I was still a Montreal fan, I rooted for Colorado until Roy's retirement.

While I still disagree that a major was justified, Emelin did have more responsibility than I originally believed.

Not that he was malicious or used excessive force, but I can believe he intended to make contact in a preemptive manner, as it was only a deflection that prevented the puck from arriving in that area at the moment of the hit.

The problem is again one of consistency, as that exact form of contact in anticipation of the puck, occurs multiple times over the course of every single game. Players are almost always contacted just prior to the puck's arrival.

What we have is 3 degrees of interference as it relates to the design and application of the rule:

1. You make contact with a player prior to the puck arriving. Which is illegal, but not a penalty.

2. You make contact with a player and the puck is prevented from arriving. This is a minor penalty.

3. You make malicious or excessive contact with a player and the puck is prevented from arriving. This is a major penalty.

Emelin was guilty of "interference in the 2nd degree".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
Guest habs1952

Bo gave Hudon an "instructional fight" at practice today. Essentially telling Bo Hudon "how" to fight. Where to grab the guy etc. Hmmmm.

Fixed it for ya geezer. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get yours today. Don't be the only one on your block without one. For the low low price of $79.99 it can be yours,,,, but wait,,there's more,,,, order now and you can receive an accessory toque for the slashed price of $19.99.

S&H extra, void where prohibited, Canadians funds only, no cross border shopping allowed,,, must be 18 years old or older.

https://tsnshop.ca/detail/7156

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get yours today. Don't be the only one on your block without one. For the low low price of $79.99 it can be yours,,,, but wait,,there's more,,,, order now and you can receive an accessory toque for the slashed price of $19.99.

S&H extra, void where prohibited, Canadians funds only, no cross border shopping allowed,,, must be 18 years old or older.

https://tsnshop.ca/detail/7156

I just ordered 20!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the ridiculous blotter:

" Canadiens star defenceman P.K. Subban has been unwittingly dragged into Quebec’s language debate after a French-language protection group voiced its concern with how his name is pronounced by sports commentators.

In a letter obtained by La Presse, the Association pour le soutien et l’usage de la langue française (ASULF) wants French commentators to stop saying his name in English, (Pee-Kay Subban). Instead, they want them to pronounce it as Pay-Kah Subban."
:blink:<_<:lol::rolleyes:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the next 9 games we have 3 B2B sets.

One of the easiest schedules out there ,,,,,right?? :rolleyes:

We had a brutal schedule last year with B2B's. Not only did we have more then most teams in the League, but a lot of them saw us playing a ton of them on the road.

Compared to a team like the Bruins, it was pretty disgusting. Let's toss in an 8 game road trip and the number of home openers we seem to do every year, with season opening road trips, and you start to wonder who the hell makes up these schedules?

It may not be the worst ( haven't really checked in to it this year) but it's got to certainly be near the bottom.

I realize we all play the same # of home and away games, but it's the structure of the schedule that can handicap a team.

I swear it's Campbell putting it together.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the easiest schedules out there ,,,,,right?? :rolleyes:

We had a brutal schedule last year with B2B's. Not only did we have more then most teams in the League, but a lot of them saw us playing a ton of them on the road.

Compared to a team like the Bruins, it was pretty disgusting. Let's toss in an 8 game road trip and the number of home openers we seem to do every year, with season opening road trips, and you start to wonder who the hell makes up these schedules?

It may not be the worst ( haven't really checked in to it this year) but it's got to certainly be near the bottom.

I realize we all play the same # of home and away games, but it's the structure of the schedule that can handicap a team.

I swear it's Campbell putting it together.

I read once that it has to do with the Hockey Night In Canada requirement for Canadian teams. American teams prefer certain weekdays, Canadian teams demand Saturdays, and only a few teams (Ottawa and Boston, in particular) seem to want Sunday matinees. So to facilitate that, Canadian teams get more back-to-backs.

When I get the time, I'll download a listing of all the games going back a decade (or more if possible) and see if there really is a significant difference in B2Bs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I read once that it has to do with the Hockey Night In Canada requirement for Canadian teams. American teams prefer certain weekdays, Canadian teams demand Saturdays, and only a few teams (Ottawa and Boston, in particular) seem to want Sunday matinees. So to facilitate that, Canadian teams get more back-to-backs.

When I get the time, I'll download a listing of all the games going back a decade (or more if possible) and see if there really is a significant difference in B2Bs.

I did one last year i believe, and although we didn't have the most B2B's, we were one of the teams up there. The difference was how many of those saw both games on the road. That should negate the argument about wanting those Saturday dates when both games are on the road. I think we were close to the League leader in that department. Boston on the other hand was just the opposite, while a good portion of their meager # of B2B's were either split, with one home and 1 away, or were both home games. It was disgusting how lopsided the schedule was in their favour.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

It has been observed on multiple occasions by many people—including myself—that the Habs under Therrien "always" play the fourth line the shift after a goal against. I decided to check. I searched my collection of NHL RTSS (Realtime Scoring System) event records for every goal against between 2012-13 and the Panthers game, which included some playoff games. I then sampled the following event, and filtered any goal which didn't have information about the players on the ice in the event following the goal, which included shootouts and overtime; the grand total was 654 goals against.

The most commonly deployed player after a goal against since the 2012-13 shortened season in these data is... David Desharnais. He's gone on the ice immediately following a goal against 222 times (33.94%). The runner up is P.K. Subban, who was out for 214 events after goals against (32.72%). You have to go down to the 7th most common player, Brandon Prust (108, 16.51%) to find a fourth liner. However, at that point there's a cluster of bottom six players (Bourque, Weise, and Moen, with Gionta in between). With defence, Markov is second (210, 32.11%), and the great majority of those were likely with P.K. Then it's Emelin, Gorges, and Bouillon.

This doesn't take line mates/D-pairs into account, which I'd like to take a look at next. I'll also see if it's significantly different for players deployed after goals for, or home vs. road. It should be noted that this has almost no statistical value for any other purpose. It's just a point of interest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^^ But could it also be that DD is on 33% of the time after a goal because Therrien gives him close to 33% of the team's ice time in general? I would guess part of it is that when we're scored on, Therrien tries to come back with his best scoring line to respond to that and seems to think that is DD-Pacman, but another part could just be that those two get more ice than anyone else this year and so are on by default anyways...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...