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2016-17 State of the Habs


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On ‎6‎/‎18‎/‎2017 at 9:43 AM, Habs_Hockey_Nutz said:

 

They paved paradise and put up a parking lot... you don't know what you've got til its gone. Really, really poor asset management from Bergevin here. And ditto Geoff Molson. And now for trading Carey Price he will... hmmm

What will happen if Bergevin ends up losing his favorite player because he won't draft skilled players?  

 

 

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https://www.habseyesontheprize.com/2017/6/19/15826654/trading-with-vegas-ahead-of-the-expansion-draft-wise-investment-for-the-habs-hudon-plekanec-emelin

The Habs are clearly in ‘win now’ mode, due to their aging core and the important contracts that are set to expire. Frankly, whether the Canadiens want to admit it or not, that should be their philosophy regardless of the rhetoric we hear every year about ‘making it to the playoffs’.

Opening up extra cap space and making a major free agent run, while keeping Galchenyuk, fits right into Bergevin’s ideal time frame. Keep in mind that Carey Price has an expiring contract next year. It will be much easier to keep him interested if the team makes a deep run at the Cup for the first time in several years. Although both Price and Bergevin have made it clear that their priority is an extension.

Of course, there’s a downside to the proposed transaction. In the past week, Bergevin has traded 2011 first-round pick Nathan Beaulieu, and his 2016 first-round pick Mikhail Sergachev. The Habs’ prospect pool was never very deep, but there were a few high end pieces still there. With the loss of Sergachev to Tampa Bay, Bergevin has traded away the 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2016 first-round pick, with the 2012 first-round selection, Galchenyuk, reportedly on the block. Losing another first-round choice would be a blow to a prospect pool that desperately needs a fresh infusion of talent. Even if the 2018 is sent to Vegas, the same issue remains: the Habs have little to no prospect depth, and should Bergevin move on, his successor will have a major hill to climb if he hopes to fix the situation

 

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13 hours ago, Regis22 said:

https://www.habseyesontheprize.com/2017/6/19/15826654/trading-with-vegas-ahead-of-the-expansion-draft-wise-investment-for-the-habs-hudon-plekanec-emelin

The Habs are clearly in ‘win now’ mode, due to their aging core and the important contracts that are set to expire. Frankly, whether the Canadiens want to admit it or not, that should be their philosophy regardless of the rhetoric we hear every year about ‘making it to the playoffs’.

Opening up extra cap space and making a major free agent run, while keeping Galchenyuk, fits right into Bergevin’s ideal time frame. Keep in mind that Carey Price has an expiring contract next year. It will be much easier to keep him interested if the team makes a deep run at the Cup for the first time in several years. Although both Price and Bergevin have made it clear that their priority is an extension.

Of course, there’s a downside to the proposed transaction. In the past week, Bergevin has traded 2011 first-round pick Nathan Beaulieu, and his 2016 first-round pick Mikhail Sergachev. The Habs’ prospect pool was never very deep, but there were a few high end pieces still there. With the loss of Sergachev to Tampa Bay, Bergevin has traded away the 2009, 2010, 2011, and 2016 first-round pick, with the 2012 first-round selection, Galchenyuk, reportedly on the block. Losing another first-round choice would be a blow to a prospect pool that desperately needs a fresh infusion of talent. Even if the 2018 is sent to Vegas, the same issue remains: the Habs have little to no prospect depth, and should Bergevin move on, his successor will have a major hill to climb if he hopes to fix the situation

 

I can't see how we can be in "win now mode" when we are giving away players for free. 

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7 hours ago, jeff33 said:

I can't see how we could possibly be in "win now" mode full stop

:2008122810303: This past season was it! Subban was traded because "Therrien couldn't win a Cup with him" and Shea Weber was to lead us to the promised land. Trading away Sergychev and giving away Beaulieu plus probably Hudon in the ED sealed our fate. Our defense isn't good enough and we can't score .... not much left for the imagination. I can't see Carey wanting to stay for this unless its all about money in which case it is money wasted by the organization. Time for a major rebuild ala the Leafs who have probably the most exciting, well coached team in hockey.  

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3 hours ago, eldag said:

:2008122810303: This past season was it! Subban was traded because "Therrien couldn't win a Cup with him" and Shea Weber was to lead us to the promised land. Trading away Sergychev and giving away Beaulieu plus probably Hudon in the ED sealed our fate. Our defense isn't good enough and we can't score .... not much left for the imagination. I can't see Carey wanting to stay for this unless its all about money in which case it is money wasted by the organization. Time for a major rebuild ala the Leafs who have probably the most exciting, well coached team in hockey.  

Sad but true.

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3 hours ago, H_T_L said:

 The Habs qualified Alex Galchenyuk, Jacob De La Rose and Max Friberg, as well as goaltender Charlie Lindgren today.

Eight restricted free agents were not tendered offers: forwards Stefan Matteau, Mark MacMillan and Connor Crisp, and defensemen Nikita Nesterov, Ryan Johnston, Joel Hanley, Dalton Thrower and Keegan Lowe.

No big losses amongst the guys we let go... which means our decision-making now was fine but once again shows how bad our development system has been that we are letting half our AHL team walk away for free.

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https://www.habseyesontheprize.com/2017/6/27/15855436/marc-bergevin-clarifying-his-approach-to-defence-emelin-beaulieu-schlemko-weber-subban-galchenyuk

Like a lot of narratives surrounding the Montreal Canadiens, this one starts with last year’s P.K. Subban-Shea Weber blockbuster.

 

General Manager Marc Bergevin signalled a focus on reliability in the defensive zone over anything else a rearguard might offer. His moves so far this off-season have only reinforced this ideology: shipping out the puck-moving-if-defensively-spotty Nathan Beaulieu for a third-rounder; leaving Nikita Nesterov to walk as an unrestricted free agent; allowing hard-hitting, giveaway-prone Alexei Emelin to be claimed in expansion.

The pieces Bergevin has added in the last few months, including Jordie Benn and more recently Dave Schlemko — both around 30 years old and known for being steady and not very flashy — are very much defencemen in line with Bergevin’s increasingly apparent philosophy. In fact, they aren’t unlike the player Bergevin was himself over the course of his 20-year career.

Low-scoring, team guys. Hard to play against.

Reliable.

Those qualities don’t necessarily jibe with the direction many teams are heading in today’s NHL. Generating offence from the back end pushed the Nashville Predators within a few wins of the Stanley Cup, as many a passerby in downtown Montreal is eager to proclaim.

 

But the repeat champion Pittsburgh Penguins won the Cup without their best defenceman, Kris Letang. Pittsburgh had three pairings of virtual unknowns held together with a little scotch tape and a lot of hope. They were efficacious and not stupendous, and capable of doing what was necessary to support the superstars on the front lines.

That’s not to say the Canadiens have stars of the calibre of Sidney Crosby or Evgeni Malkin, and it’s no secret the Habs are still looking for help on the back end. But the moves made by Bergevin do indicate it’s something of a model the GM may be watching with interest.

Rumours have linked the Tricolore to the New York Islanders and the Minnesota Wild, with scoring forward Alex Galchenyuk mentioned as the piece potentially going the other way. But Bergevin wants several assets in return for the 30-goal-scorer, and that’s not an unfair ask for a player who has only scratched the surface of his potential.

 

But it’s not news that Montreal is lacking in the scoring department, and while Galchenyuk definitely has his flaws, he is a highly capable offensive contributor. The further addition of Jonathan Drouin gives the Canadiens a more potent top six, and the idea of Drouin and Galchenyuk working together on a power play is enough to make fans drool and opponents sweat.

Having seen what other teams are offering, that duo may be proving too enticing to give up on, and the GM’s game plan regarding Galchenyuk may be changing.

There’s no question that Bergevin isn’t finished playing the market, and he’s never been one to shy away from pulling the trigger on surprise deals big or small. Both defence and centre remain areas of need, but it’s not hard to envision a Montreal team built to be big and reliable on defence, led by skilled forwards capable of gaining the zone, and finishing when they get there.

 

Carey Price is in negotiations for a new contract. The Canadiens bringing in defensive help to insulate him, while adding goal-scoring to take the team off his shoulders, has to seem like a pretty good sell.

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I don't understand this article. So ... Bergevin is using Pittsburgh as his model? That's great news!!!  Let us know when he has acquired Crosby, Malkin, Kessel, Sheery, and Justin Schultz to round out his line up of ham and eggers. The first three of the latter players scored more than 70 points each in the regular season and the last two were in the 50's. The Habs had two players exceed fifty points ......and one of them is all but gone!

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2 hours ago, Regis22 said:

https://www.habseyesontheprize.com/2017/6/27/15855436/marc-bergevin-clarifying-his-approach-to-defence-emelin-beaulieu-schlemko-weber-subban-galchenyuk

Like a lot of narratives surrounding the Montreal Canadiens, this one starts with last year’s P.K. Subban-Shea Weber blockbuster.

 

General Manager Marc Bergevin signalled a focus on reliability in the defensive zone over anything else a rearguard might offer. His moves so far this off-season have only reinforced this ideology: shipping out the puck-moving-if-defensively-spotty Nathan Beaulieu for a third-rounder; leaving Nikita Nesterov to walk as an unrestricted free agent; allowing hard-hitting, giveaway-prone Alexei Emelin to be claimed in expansion.

The pieces Bergevin has added in the last few months, including Jordie Benn and more recently Dave Schlemko — both around 30 years old and known for being steady and not very flashy — are very much defencemen in line with Bergevin’s increasingly apparent philosophy. In fact, they aren’t unlike the player Bergevin was himself over the course of his 20-year career.

Low-scoring, team guys. Hard to play against.

Reliable.

Those qualities don’t necessarily jibe with the direction many teams are heading in today’s NHL. Generating offence from the back end pushed the Nashville Predators within a few wins of the Stanley Cup, as many a passerby in downtown Montreal is eager to proclaim.

 

But the repeat champion Pittsburgh Penguins won the Cup without their best defenceman, Kris Letang. Pittsburgh had three pairings of virtual unknowns held together with a little scotch tape and a lot of hope. They were efficacious and not stupendous, and capable of doing what was necessary to support the superstars on the front lines.

That’s not to say the Canadiens have stars of the calibre of Sidney Crosby or Evgeni Malkin, and it’s no secret the Habs are still looking for help on the back end. But the moves made by Bergevin do indicate it’s something of a model the GM may be watching with interest.

Rumours have linked the Tricolore to the New York Islanders and the Minnesota Wild, with scoring forward Alex Galchenyuk mentioned as the piece potentially going the other way. But Bergevin wants several assets in return for the 30-goal-scorer, and that’s not an unfair ask for a player who has only scratched the surface of his potential.

 

But it’s not news that Montreal is lacking in the scoring department, and while Galchenyuk definitely has his flaws, he is a highly capable offensive contributor. The further addition of Jonathan Drouin gives the Canadiens a more potent top six, and the idea of Drouin and Galchenyuk working together on a power play is enough to make fans drool and opponents sweat.

Having seen what other teams are offering, that duo may be proving too enticing to give up on, and the GM’s game plan regarding Galchenyuk may be changing.

There’s no question that Bergevin isn’t finished playing the market, and he’s never been one to shy away from pulling the trigger on surprise deals big or small. Both defence and centre remain areas of need, but it’s not hard to envision a Montreal team built to be big and reliable on defence, led by skilled forwards capable of gaining the zone, and finishing when they get there.

 

Carey Price is in negotiations for a new contract. The Canadiens bringing in defensive help to insulate him, while adding goal-scoring to take the team off his shoulders, has to seem like a pretty good sell.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA! Comical. Our offense is so bad we NEED D-men who can score/generate offense. 

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http://montrealgazette.com/sports/hockey/nhl/montreal-canadiens/montreal-canadiens-are-in-desperate-need-of-more-bodies-on-defence

 

General manager Marc Bergevin is fond of saying you can never have enough defencemen, but the Canadiens currently don’t have enough defencemen to stock the NHL team and their minor-league franchises in Laval and Brampton. 

The Canadiens have 11 defencemen under contract and four of them have never played a single game in the NHL. 

Bergevin is shopping for a top-four defencemen, but over the past two weeks, the Canadiens have said goodbye to eight defencemen while adding only one — David Schlemko. 

The Canadiens traded prospect Mikhail Sergachev and Nathan Beaulieu and lost Alexei Emelin to Vegas in the expansion draft. Earlier this week, the Canadiens declined to make qualifying offers to Nikita Nesterov, Ryan Johnston, Dalton Thrower, Joel Hanley and Keegan Lowe. All five are now unrestricted free agents. 

The current roster includes only two proven top-four defenceman — Shea Weber and Jeff Petry. Andrei Markov is an unrestricted free agent who should be in the fold. He has made it clear he wants to stay in Montreal and the lone hangup may be the Canadiens’ reluctance to sign him for more than one season and his asking price of $6 million

 

Jordie Benn, Brandon Davidson and Schlemko have been bottom-pair defencemen for most of their careers, although Benn played top-four minutes in the playoffs.

The best bet to plug the hole in the top four appears to be Karl Alzner of the Washington Capitals. He has visited Montreal in the past week and told Jean-François Chaumont of Journal de Montréal that he’s interested in playing here. He had a $2.8 million cap hit last season and could be a reasonable acquisition. He’s a physical defenceman and that’s an area where Montreal needs help after losing Emelin but Alzner’s foot speed is suspect.

Two possibilities among the other signed players are Brett Lernout, who didn’t look out of place in the three NHL games he played last season and Jakub Jerabek, a 26-year-old Czech who had 34 points in 59 games in the KHL last season. Rookies Simon Bourque and Noah Juulsen both need more seasoning. 

The Canadiens are also looking to bolster the offence and Martin Hanzal’s name is popping up again. That’s because he’s 6-foot-6 and 225 pounds and he’s a centre. 

As teams made their qualifying offers Monday, there were two players who weren’t tendered offers and either would be intriguing if Bergevin is in the mood for taking on another Russian reclamation project, a gamble which paid off with Alex Radulov and not so much with Alex Semin. 

Prospect No. 1 is right winger Nail Yakupov, who was cut loose by the St. Louis Blues. Edmonton made him the first overall pick in the 2012 draft, but his career has been on a slide since he scored 17 goals as a rookie. Yakupov had some chemistry with Alex Galchenyuk in their one full season with the Sarnia Sting and the hope would be that they could recapture that magic. Yakupov had three goals and six assists in 40 games with the Blues and, when he wasn’t a healthy scratch, he averaged fewer than 11 minutes a game.

He needs confidence and playing time and, perhaps, more commitment to defence. Over 292 NHL games, he’s a minus-91. He made $2.5 million last season. 

The other candidate is Mikhail Grigorenko who, like Radulov, played junior hockey in Quebec City. Things might have gone better for him last season in Colorado if Patrick Roy hadn’t bailed, but he had 10 goals and 13 assists in 75 games. Grigorenko is attractive because he’s a big centre — 6-foot-3 and 210 pounds — and he won nearly 58 per cent of his faceoffs last season. His cap hit was $1.3 million

 

 

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I feel sorry for the next GM who has to clean up the mess. Even a rebuild is complicated, trying to offload heavy contracts with restrictions, while managing cap space.

No confidence in Molson's resolve to conduct a Leafs-style scorched Earth complete overhaul.

Stability through mediocrity!

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Our Cup window is closing rapidly. We might even see it close during this season. The team has had no plan for Galchenyuk for years, and seemingly continues to have no plan to develop a first line centerman. We've just invested an absurd amount in goaltending. Our defense looks pretty darn ugly right now, and Markov appears poised to leave just like Radulov left. Will Galchenyuk be disposed of, as well?

This has been one of the most disappointing off-seasons since Bergevin took over. The longer you have no proper strategy to build a team the worse these moments begin to look like, I guess. I hope Bergevin is not the GM of this team by 2018-2019. He has failed to take this team to the next level and has seemingly taken it a step or two back. Weber for Subban, signing Alzner, Carey's absurd extension, not developing young talent, relying on Therrien for too long... What a disappointing recent history to consider.

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Nesterov gone

Sergachev gone

Emelin gone

Radulov gone

Markov possibly on his way out

Galchenyuk on the trade block (and yes I know he's technically American)

 

... the Russian contingent of our team has abruptly been sent packing.

 

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7 hours ago, PuckPundit said:

I feel sorry for the next GM who has to clean up the mess. Even a rebuild is complicated, trying to offload heavy contracts with restrictions, while managing cap space.

No confidence in Molson's resolve to conduct a Leafs-style scorched Earth complete overhaul.

Stability through mediocrity!

Which rebuild of the Leafs are you talking about?? They' ve had about 10 of them in the last 20 years. :lol:

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24 minutes ago, ramcharger440 said:

all of the teams that have done well lately were trainwrecks for years before they got the #1 draft picks that make them great now. this league does not award good solid play! it is a win now then crash and burn to retool league!

The Cap era has changed how teams are built and maintained. Winning becomes expensive to maintain and the great GM's are challenged to find a way to sustain. Chicago and Detroit and Pittsburgh and Los Angeles are good examples of maintaining after winning. What do all these teams have? Great General Managers .... something we have not had since Sammy left ..... but even he operated in the non-cap era with much less competition. This team is not capable of winning because we don't even have a competent GM nor an owner who is committed to winning. Look at what was done with Laval in hiring back SL to coach in spite of his pathetic record of development and won/loss experience.

As long as Montreal fans are happy to support this losing regime with their money the Canadiens will continue to play politics of language ahead of winning as their basic philosophy. It is like the Harold Ballard era in Toronto where years went buy with no hope of even being respectable.

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To hear you speak we are a bottom of the barrel team with no hope of ever winning a game! I am not happy with some of the decisions that have been made with personel on ice or behind the bench either but we are not as bad as some portray us to be. we have fielded competitive teams since MB  got here except for the one where our #1 player in the most important position was out. One knock I have with MB is his inability to get a #1 center. to a lesser degree because we don't know yet what will happen before opening day I also am worried about out #2 D. Other than that we are quite solid on wing right now and with one more good deal or signing we will have a good D corps, in net we are set for several years. some complaints are understandable but we are not that bad right now but it could go either way from here.

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1 hour ago, ramcharger440 said:

. we have fielded competitive teams since MB  got here except for the one where our #1 player in the most important position was out.

The only reason the team was competitive was because of the # 1 player being in the line up - take him out and this team struggles for the most aprt

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