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^^ No one is saying that what any of those other players did was acceptable either. And no one is saying Mailloux is the only one to have committed an egregious transgression. I'm sure there are plenty of other hockey players and men who have done the same and just haven't been caught. And yes, the young man can make amends and move on, but from the sound of it, he never really made much of an apology to the victim. His apology now seems to have a lot more to do with cleaning up his public image than anything else. So it's hard to know if he's changed or learned anything or if this is just what he's being coached to say and do now.

The bottom line for me is that yes, it's great if he's doing counseling and saying he's sorry and claiming he wants to be part of the solution going forward. But he also stated he didn't want to be drafted and asked for a year to get his life together. And yes, I 100% believe if it wasn't the Habs, it would have been another team who drafted him. But therein is a lot of the problem. Society today says it's okay for you to break the law or be offensive and we can overlook it if you're good at something or famous. Yes, look at Austin Matthews. Look at Ben Roethlisberger. Look at Robert Kraft. People find ways to brush things under the rug. Yes, people are upset by Mailloux's actions, but what's even more upsetting is the Habs essentially condoning his actions. Mailloux might have made his decision in the spur of a moment and shown a lack of judgment. The Habs had a bunch of guys who reflected on this and thought about what it would mean. They went to the league and verified that he was still eligible to be drafted. They knew about his legal case. And they decided that it was still fine for them to draft him. Bergevin himself said that the team felt he was the most talented player available to them. And that's what it came down to: the Habs said that they wanted this guy as their on-ice target and the rest wasn't important. The rest wasn't important. They basically stated that the fact this young man compromised a young woman's rights was not as important as the fact he was the most talented player left in the draft. It was more important to the team to get a skilled player than to consider his actions off the ice, what they did to the victim, or what message drafting him would give. It's telling people that if you're good enough at hockey we're willing to overlook whatever you do off the ice, even if it's illegal.

IMO, it's a bad look for the organization, especially with Bergevin being preachy his entire tenure about how much character matters and especially with Bergevin having been with the Hawks when it seems like another sexual assault was brushed under the table and overlooked. As I said before, it was convenient for MB to bring up character talking about Subban or Galchenyuk or Beaulieu. It's less convenient for him now and frankly, we should be holding the team to a higher standard.

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22 minutes ago, BigTed3 said:

^^ No one is saying that what any of those other players did was acceptable either. And no one is saying Mailloux is the only one to have committed an egregious transgression. I'm sure there are plenty of other hockey players and men who have done the same and just haven't been caught. And yes, the young man can make amends and move on, but from the sound of it, he never really made much of an apology to the victim. His apology now seems to have a lot more to do with cleaning up his public image than anything else. So it's hard to know if he's changed or learned anything or if this is just what he's being coached to say and do now.

The bottom line for me is that yes, it's great if he's doing counseling and saying he's sorry and claiming he wants to be part of the solution going forward. But he also stated he didn't want to be drafted and asked for a year to get his life together. And yes, I 100% believe if it wasn't the Habs, it would have been another team who drafted him. But therein is a lot of the problem. Society today says it's okay for you to break the law or be offensive and we can overlook it if you're good at something or famous. Yes, look at Austin Matthews. Look at Ben Roethlisberger. Look at Robert Kraft. People find ways to brush things under the rug. Yes, people are upset by Mailloux's actions, but what's even more upsetting is the Habs essentially condoning his actions. Mailloux might have made his decision in the spur of a moment and shown a lack of judgment. The Habs had a bunch of guys who reflected on this and thought about what it would mean. They went to the league and verified that he was still eligible to be drafted. They knew about his legal case. And they decided that it was still fine for them to draft him. Bergevin himself said that the team felt he was the most talented player available to them. And that's what it came down to: the Habs said that they wanted this guy as their on-ice target and the rest wasn't important. The rest wasn't important. They basically stated that the fact this young man compromised a young woman's rights was not as important as the fact he was the most talented player left in the draft. It was more important to the team to get a skilled player than to consider his actions off the ice, what they did to the victim, or what message drafting him would give. It's telling people that if you're good enough at hockey we're willing to overlook whatever you do off the ice, even if it's illegal.

IMO, it's a bad look for the organization, especially with Bergevin being preachy his entire tenure about how much character matters and especially with Bergevin having been with the Hawks when it seems like another sexual assault was brushed under the table and overlooked. As I said before, it was convenient for MB to bring up character talking about Subban or Galchenyuk or Beaulieu. It's less convenient for him now and frankly, we should be holding the team to a higher standard.

This seems more to be an attack on MB than really having anything to do with what is actually going on with this kid. I just can't see how anyone can say this is about condoning what the kid did? we don't know what actions will be taken and we also don't know nor should we know what was said by the kid to the victim it is none of our business what is said between those two it has nothing to do with hockey. and as for the kid being a big star with all this privilege and or fame well lets see if he ever gets there first no? as for the victims rights there will never be a time that this is ever going to be over for her all any of them can do is deal with it and move forward how that happens is going to be tough and a long road. how it looks on the team is really not important.

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Bottom line, this kid f*&ked up.  He has to take repsonsibility for this young girl. I dont care if he was good enough to be number one in the draft. As long as society says because you have a certain skill what ever you do doesn't matter that is what is f*&ked up. There is no way we should have drafted this kid. Being young does not make it right. After being caught telling everybody your sorry doesn't make it right. Taking the punishment may help. Taking him out or the draft may have proven to other young men you dont get away with this shit. We have show to society. If doesnt matter how good you are at something you will always have less value then someone you  f**&cked over not the other way around. 

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42 minutes ago, caperns61 said:

Bottom line, this kid f*&ked up.  He has to take repsonsibility for this young girl. I dont care if he was good enough to be number one in the draft. As long as society says because you have a certain skill what ever you do doesn't matter that is what is f*&ked up. There is no way we should have drafted this kid. Being young does not make it right. After being caught telling everybody your sorry doesn't make it right. Taking the punishment may help. Taking him out or the draft may have proven to other young men you dont get away with this shit. We have show to society. If doesnt matter how good you are at something you will always have less value then someone you  f**&cked over not the other way around. 

He took the punshment..... it was a fine he paid it, people just want him to have more. there are facts here we may not like them but we can't just gloss them over because we are mad or we want too. it is too easy to get caught up in the B.S  what should happen here? how many actually know what the actual charge was? how many jump on the bandwagon and torch the kid? he did wrong he should be given the chance to make it right as much for the victim as for himself or are we just going to end his chance to carry on in whatever fashion he may, does that not make the rest of us just as bad? there is a whole life ahead of this guy too he screwed up 100% pretty sure he gets it now with all the self righteous online bull he is going to have to live with from here on out! way to easy to judge form our homes what these kids are going through. This kid did not get away with anything! he got caught and the whole world knows it. what is next do we burn him at the stake? mob rules here we come!

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1 hour ago, BigTed3 said:

IMO, it's a bad look for the organization, especially with Bergevin being preachy his entire tenure about how much character matters and especially with Bergevin having been with the Hawks when it seems like another sexual assault was brushed under the table and overlooked. As I said before, it was convenient for MB to bring up character talking about Subban or Galchenyuk or Beaulieu. It's less convenient for him now and frankly, we should be holding the team to a higher standard.

Definitely,  the optics are bad. It's not just people on Twitter that are ranting. It's ALL the papers, news networks, and high ranking analysts , reporters that are running with this. So if you didn't know about it, everybody knows about it now. I have a 20yo. daughter,  and if something like this happened,  she would be devastated. I know for sure, that there have been exact situations like this in the past, and some of them did not end well.

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2 hours ago, BigTed3 said:

^^ No one is saying that what any of those other players did was acceptable either. And no one is saying Mailloux is the only one to have committed an egregious transgression. I'm sure there are plenty of other hockey players and men who have done the same and just haven't been caught. And yes, the young man can make amends and move on, but from the sound of it, he never really made much of an apology to the victim. His apology now seems to have a lot more to do with cleaning up his public image than anything else. So it's hard to know if he's changed or learned anything or if this is just what he's being coached to say and do now.

The bottom line for me is that yes, it's great if he's doing counseling and saying he's sorry and claiming he wants to be part of the solution going forward. But he also stated he didn't want to be drafted and asked for a year to get his life together. And yes, I 100% believe if it wasn't the Habs, it would have been another team who drafted him. But therein is a lot of the problem. Society today says it's okay for you to break the law or be offensive and we can overlook it if you're good at something or famous. Yes, look at Austin Matthews. Look at Ben Roethlisberger. Look at Robert Kraft. People find ways to brush things under the rug. Yes, people are upset by Mailloux's actions, but what's even more upsetting is the Habs essentially condoning his actions. Mailloux might have made his decision in the spur of a moment and shown a lack of judgment. The Habs had a bunch of guys who reflected on this and thought about what it would mean. They went to the league and verified that he was still eligible to be drafted. They knew about his legal case. And they decided that it was still fine for them to draft him. Bergevin himself said that the team felt he was the most talented player available to them. And that's what it came down to: the Habs said that they wanted this guy as their on-ice target and the rest wasn't important. The rest wasn't important. They basically stated that the fact this young man compromised a young woman's rights was not as important as the fact he was the most talented player left in the draft. It was more important to the team to get a skilled player than to consider his actions off the ice, what they did to the victim, or what message drafting him would give. It's telling people that if you're good enough at hockey we're willing to overlook whatever you do off the ice, even if it's illegal.

IMO, it's a bad look for the organization, especially with Bergevin being preachy his entire tenure about how much character matters and especially with Bergevin having been with the Hawks when it seems like another sexual assault was brushed under the table and overlooked. As I said before, it was convenient for MB to bring up character talking about Subban or Galchenyuk or Beaulieu. It's less convenient for him now and frankly, we should be holding the team to a higher standard.

Ted, I don't see how drafting a player, is the same as condoning his actions. We can argue all night about why the Habs shouldn't have picked Mailloux or the optics of how this looks but by doing so we are forgetting that this is a private matter that was settled in court by the kid pleading guilty and paying his court imposed fine. Who are we to say that this fine was or wasn't enough of a punishment? Who are we to say that the shame and guilt and embarrassment that both these young people are going to deal with for the foreseeable future isn't enough of a punishment? No one is saying that they condone what the kid has done. The only thing we are saying is that he has paid his dues and deserves the chance to move on with his life just as his victim has those same rights. He will continue to pay his dues through the curse of social media and the vengeance of society. However even a person sent to prison for bank robbery once released is considered to have paid his debt and is allowed to move on with their life. Why shouldn't this kid be afforded the same rights as a former bank robber? He plead guilt and owned up to his transgression. He didn't try to fight it or desensitize it he owned it. He paid the fine and apologized to his victim (a short apology is still better than no apology. Plus we don't know why it was so short perhaps it is because he was embarrassed and genuinely regretted his actions). The Canadiens are as good of an organization as any to help turn this young man's life around and help put him on the right path for success not only in hockey but also in life itself. Also they are one of the very few organizations in the league that have the ability to help the victim as well both through Financial resources and through their numerous therapists and counselors employed by or retained by the organization. My hope and belief is that both these young people will receive the help they need to move forward from the Canadiens.

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1 hour ago, campabee82 said:

Ted, I don't see how drafting a player, is the same as condoning his actions. We can argue all night about why the Habs shouldn't have picked Mailloux or the optics of how this looks but by doing so we are forgetting that this is a private matter that was settled in court by the kid pleading guilty and paying his court imposed fine. Who are we to say that this fine was or wasn't enough of a punishment? Who are we to say that the shame and guilt and embarrassment that both these young people are going to deal with for the foreseeable future isn't enough of a punishment? No one is saying that they condone what the kid has done. The only thing we are saying is that he has paid his dues and deserves the chance to move on with his life just as his victim has those same rights. He will continue to pay his dues through the curse of social media and the vengeance of society. However even a person sent to prison for bank robbery once released is considered to have paid his debt and is allowed to move on with their life. Why shouldn't this kid be afforded the same rights as a former bank robber? He plead guilt and owned up to his transgression. He didn't try to fight it or desensitize it he owned it. He paid the fine and apologized to his victim (a short apology is still better than no apology. Plus we don't know why it was so short perhaps it is because he was embarrassed and genuinely regretted his actions). The Canadiens are as good of an organization as any to help turn this young man's life around and help put him on the right path for success not only in hockey but also in life itself. Also they are one of the very few organizations in the league that have the ability to help the victim as well both through Financial resources and through their numerous therapists and counselors employed by or retained by the organization. My hope and belief is that both these young people will receive the help they need to move forward from the Canadiens.

This, and I feel the nature of the crime doesn't warrant the overreaction that seems to be in vogue for news sites and commentators now.  It's like they're talking about a roving sexual predator.  If this was any kind of assault or worse I'd totally be on board with him getting railroaded.  The fact that he's been convicted of a crime and getting the negative treatment he mostly deserves shows how far we've come as society in the past 20 or even 10 years.  I never heard of anything like this when I played minor hockey but it wouldn't have surprised me back then (mid/late 90s).  It would never had made it to the cops though, nevermind the local news.  

About comparisons, they don't excuse the offense but it does let us get a feel as to how bad something is.  He didn't share the picture with the whole world or try to sell it or do anything even worse.  And as already said, he's paid for it and will continue to pay dearly for a long time.

I do feel that it's a gamble hockey wise in that he may be damaged goods now.  Not saying he's a victim at all but he's gonna be dragging this around for a while.  Its also obviously a gamble in hoping the damage done to the brand is minimal while hoping the news cycles on to something else.

Also I wonder if people think that the teams that didn't even interview him did so from some moral high ground?  They felt they had more to lose than gain, and if anything felt that in staying away they gained the optics of good morality.  They felt they would have taken on the damage that Mailloux has done to himself if they gave him any of their time (and obviously the habs have at this point).

Who knows, in the end this may have been a terrible business move but maybe not.

And finally I know there's a victim in all this.  She was humiliated, had her privacy breached, trust taken advantage of, and used for a quick ego boost by an immature arrogant a-hole.  Said a-hole was a minor at the time and that's suppose to be taken into account.  I know our justice system does, I'd imagine swedens does too.  I feel and hope that she will 100% recover from this.  Let's also hope that this now young man can better himself as both a hockey player and a person because for better or worse he's a habs prospect now!

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6 hours ago, Mr--Huet said:

This, and I feel the nature of the crime doesn't warrant the overreaction that seems to be in vogue for news sites and commentators now.  It's like they're talking about a roving sexual predator.  If this was any kind of assault or worse I'd totally be on board with him getting railroaded.  The fact that he's been convicted of a crime and getting the negative treatment he mostly deserves shows how far we've come as society in the past 20 or even 10 years.  I never heard of anything like this when I played minor hockey but it wouldn't have surprised me back then (mid/late 90s).  It would never had made it to the cops though, nevermind the local news.  

About comparisons, they don't excuse the offense but it does let us get a feel as to how bad something is.  He didn't share the picture with the whole world or try to sell it or do anything even worse.  And as already said, he's paid for it and will continue to pay dearly for a long time.

I do feel that it's a gamble hockey wise in that he may be damaged goods now.  Not saying he's a victim at all but he's gonna be dragging this around for a while.  Its also obviously a gamble in hoping the damage done to the brand is minimal while hoping the news cycles on to something else.

Also I wonder if people think that the teams that didn't even interview him did so from some moral high ground?  They felt they had more to lose than gain, and if anything felt that in staying away they gained the optics of good morality.  They felt they would have taken on the damage that Mailloux has done to himself if they gave him any of their time (and obviously the habs have at this point).

Who knows, in the end this may have been a terrible business move but maybe not.

And finally I know there's a victim in all this.  She was humiliated, had her privacy breached, trust taken advantage of, and used for a quick ego boost by an immature arrogant a-hole.  Said a-hole was a minor at the time and that's suppose to be taken into account.  I know our justice system does, I'd imagine swedens does too.  I feel and hope that she will 100% recover from this.  Let's also hope that this now young man can better himself as both a hockey player and a person because for better or worse he's a habs prospect now!

Yep 100%

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https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/groups-say-habs-draft-choice-trivializes-violence-against-women/wcm/b3d4f134-e0f1-4c77-9323-216d567dd54a

Groups say Habs' draft choice 'trivializes' violence against women

Montreal Canadiens' decision to draft Logan Mailloux sends a terrible message to fans, according to Quebec advocacy groups and politicians.

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https://torontosun.com/sports/hockey/nhl/traikos-what-was-canadiens-gm-marc-bergevin-thinking-by-drafting-logan-mailloux

TRAIKOS: What was Canadiens GM Marc Bergevin thinking by drafting Logan Mailloux?

 

After all, it’s not like Mailloux was considered a can’t-miss-prospect. According to an interview that his victim did with The Athletic, his apology, which he delivered via “a text that was no longer than three sentences,” hasn’t even been accepted.

“Most polarizing pick in the history of the NHL Draft,” said ESPN analyst Sam Cosentino.

“Honestly, speechless,” said Mark Seidel, a chief scout with North American Central Scouting, who had him ranked 64th overall. “Most shocking moment in 29 years of doing this. There have been bad kids. This is next level. I don’t think he warrants a first-round pick, regardless of the incident or not. He’s a kid who’s never played in major junior. He certainly has a lot of physical tools, but there are other kids who play the way he plays that you could have.”

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52 minutes ago, Regis22 said:

“Honestly, speechless,” said Mark Seidel, a chief scout with North American Central Scouting, who had him ranked 64th overall. “Most shocking moment in 29 years of doing this. There have been bad kids. This is next level. I don’t think he warrants a first-round pick, regardless of the incident or not. He’s a kid who’s never played in major junior. He certainly has a lot of physical tools, but there are other kids who play the way he plays that you could have.”

Is it though, “next level”? Obviously it’s not good, but next level compared to what?

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13 minutes ago, MALMACIAN_CRUNCH said:

Is it though, “next level”? Obviously it’s not good, but next level compared to what?

Yep lots of folks not even looking into the facts. it was a bad thing to do for sure it has and will continue to be dealt with I am sure. the kid may or may not turn out to be a good player. I am here to talk hockey.

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1 hour ago, Regis22 said:

Sounds like a wasted first round draft pick 

I can see pressure building to rescind the draft choice all together. This is not going away tomorrow as MB would hope.

 

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7 hours ago, H_T_L said:

I can see pressure building to rescind the draft choice all together. This is not going away tomorrow as MB would hope.

 

I'm doubtful something like that will happen. While I disagree with the pick, the pick was made... Everyone can make their own choice as to what degree that may/may not want to support the team because of it. For me, it just amplifies my wishes for Bergevin to lose his job. Which is how I've felt for several years.

I hope the woman who was the victim of this act receives all the support she needs and can move forward positively in her life. I hope Mailloux truly understands how his actions hurt that person, that he has empathy for that person, and he grows into a better young man.

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On Instagram ‘all Canadiens’ there’s a video of someone questioning Trevor Timmons on the selection asking him why do you think the player earned the right to be drafted when The player himself said he did not earn that right . For about 10 to 15 seconds he says nothing . It’s like he doesn’t have an snswe . 

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14 minutes ago, Regis22 said:

On Instagram ‘all Canadiens’ there’s a video of someone questioning Trevor Timmons on the selection asking him why do you think the player earned the right to be drafted when The player himself said he did not earn that right . For about 10 to 15 seconds he says nothing . It’s like he doesn’t have an snswe . 

Is it true, that TT didn't have a say with this pick?

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12 minutes ago, Regis22 said:

On Instagram ‘all Canadiens’ there’s a video of someone questioning Trevor Timmons on the selection asking him why do you think the player earned the right to be drafted when The player himself said he did not earn that right . For about 10 to 15 seconds he says nothing . It’s like he doesn’t have an snswe . 

Foxhole time.

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39 minutes ago, Regis22 said:

On Instagram ‘all Canadiens’ there’s a video of someone questioning Trevor Timmons on the selection asking him why do you think the player earned the right to be drafted when The player himself said he did not earn that right . For about 10 to 15 seconds he says nothing . It’s like he doesn’t have an snswe . 

Maybe TT & MB had a difference of opinion. 

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22 hours ago, campabee82 said:

Ted, I don't see how drafting a player, is the same as condoning his actions. 

Because we should live in a society where there are ramifications for your actions and ramification for being a shitty human being.    Should he never get to play prohockey? Not saying that ... should teams have shunned him and possibly made his route to making hockey a career that much harder? Yes.

Far too often fame, money or power and you get to walk scot free from your actions.   

2 hours ago, HARBORSPORT said:

like the kid or not, like the pick or not, agree with MB or not......fact is >>  this kid will be buried in the lower ranks for at least couple of years until the media wears out the subject, 

And that'll be fine as well ... as that would be the paying the consequences for his actions instead of jumping to the NHL and making close to a million a year.

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