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Boston (8) Vs Montreal (1) Series Discussion


jl-1

  

183 members have voted

  1. 1. Who will win this series?

    • Montreal in 4
      36
    • Montreal in 5
      83
    • Montreal in 6
      21
    • Montreal in 7
      26
    • Boston in 4
      1
    • Boston in 5
      0
    • Boston in 6
      2
    • Boston in 7
      14


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The last 2 games have scared me as Julien seems to be out-coaching our boy Carbo.

For game 4, I definitely would expect to see O'Byrne on D, Streit up front, and Dandy in the press box. Higgins is playing with serious heart, and even Ryder is showing flashes of his 06-07 self at times. Price hasn't been phased all series... he's just as cool and confident as ever.

After the night off I expect to see the boys get back to their old form after the game 3 wake-up, and possibly an 8-1 blowout like early this season?! Call me crazy!?

I agree, it does seem that we are getting outcoached and we need to put O'Byrne in. I like the way Dandy has been playing, why bench him....bench Breezer.

I doubt that we will win that big; I'm calling another nailbiter 3-2....

I'd like to know what explicit examples that you both have to say that Julien is "out-coaching" Carbonneau.

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Guest caperns
Two years ago it was Fernando Pisani ( Edmonton )

There is always oen guy who elevates his game beyond what is normal for him and we need someone to do that for the Habs

We do and his name is Carey Price. Not normal for a 20 year old kid to come in and play the way he has been so far.

All we need is our power play start to click and this series is over.

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Guest Innis_Mor
I'd like to know what explicit examples that you both have to say that Julien is "out-coaching" Carbonneau.
personally, I would charachterize more as Carbo made is somewhat easier for Julien to adapt, plan, change, address.

Carbo came back in Game 2 with the exact same line-up, same lines, same game plan, same pretty much everything. It was considered to have "worked" in Game 2 because the Habs squeaked out an OT win. Did they outplay Bruins in Game 2? No. Did they have troubles with some of the adaptations Julien came with in Game 2? Yes.

For Game 3 Julien tweaked some more; Carbo did somewhere around nothing (as the Habs did not lose Game 2). Game 3 result, well, we all know. Now, I am not saying it is all Carbo's fault.

Just that I am not ever big on the passive strategy of "if it ain't broke don't fix it" (depends on your definition of broke). The "keep everything exactly the same until you lose" has always troubled me, with any team/coach ("e.g., Sens' goalies -- "win and you in"), but at play-off time it is really dangerous.

You have to stay a somewhat moving target, strategy-wise.

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Guest LarryRobinson
I'd like to know what explicit examples that you both have to say that Julien is "out-coaching" Carbonneau.

Well I personally dont think Julien is "out coaching" Carbs, but the easiest thing one could point to is the fact that Julien has taken a poorly ranked PK unit and nullified the leagues top PP. You can say its the players not playing up to their capabilities and I wouldnt disagree. He also moved Ward onto a pairing with Chara and took Wideman off that unit. It worked, made the Chara-Ward unit much more formidable as a shutdown pairing against the Kovy line.

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Guest LarryRobinson

A Boston Globe article highlighting our PP and the Bruins effectiveness at limiting us. Read the full article: http://www.boston.com/sports/hockey/bruins...nd_bold/?page=2

Kovalev has several options: First, he can draw the box to him, then dish up top to Streit. Second, he can drift down low and feed Plekanec at the goal line, then cut to the middle for a return pass. Third, he can spot Markov going back-door and fire a cross-ice pass. Fourth, he can draw the defenders to the boards, then dump the puck to Kostitsyn in front. Fifth, he can attack the box directly by coming off the boards with the puck into the middle of the ice, where he can shoot or wait for the defense to collapse on him.

Kovalev, who recorded 47 of his 84 regular-season points on the power play, has been too stationary at times. His teammates, in turn, have stood around and waited for Kovalev to pull off the impossible, allowing the Bruins to negate their primary weapon.

"They're a skilled team," said Jeremy Reich. "If you give them a space, they're going to find it. We've got to limit the plays we give them and make sure we're bearing down on every chance to get it out."

When Kovalev has the puck, the penalty killers' first job is to keep the winger on the perimeter against the boards. Julien has emphasized the middle of the ice, in both even-strength and power-play situations, and the Bruins have had their sticks in any passing lanes that might open up.

But if one of the penalty-killing forwards steers Kovalev up or down the wall, the other forward must be ready to seal off the seam, marking either Kostitsyn in the slot or Markov at the far post.

"The middle guy is so important," said Glen Metropolit, who usually kills penalties with P.J. Axelsson. "You've got to trust him for that seam pass.

"I think that's what it comes down to - trust in each guy. Everyone's got to do their job. Earlier in the year, we weren't doing so well. But I think guys are trying to take care of their own responsibilities."

The Bruins ran into discipline problems late in Game 2. Reich was called for holding at 12:50 of the third period. Metropolit was nabbed for tripping. Shawn Thornton clipped forward Tom Kostopoulos in the face, drawing a four-minute high-sticking double minor. Then in overtime, Reich tripped Markov, setting up Kovalev's game-winner.

They were far more trustworthy Sunday, when they gave the Canadiens only four power plays. On the occasions they had men in the penalty box, the Bruins blocked shots, poked sticks in lanes, hounded Kovalev, and relied on Thomas - it's often said that the goalie is the biggest component of a penalty kill - to keep the Canadiens from converting.

"It's a bunch of things," Andrew Ference said. "It's tough to really point to one thing.

"In the playoffs, there's more attention to detail and more intensity. You know how quickly a goal on the power play can change an entire game. You treat it almost like it's the last minute of the game.

"It's that kind of intensity. That kind of importance is placed on it."

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Guest Maritimer11

In regards to the PP, I can see the play coming before it happens, Kovalev on the boards passes down low to pleks, passes infront and Boston clears, they just need to switch that up and make a different play that we don't see coming 9 times out of 10.

I would also love to see Grabs in the lineup, now who you take out can really be anyone besides Kostopolus and Begin from the 3rd and 4th line as far as I'm concerned.

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Guest whyback
A Boston Globe article highlighting our PP and the Bruins effectiveness at limiting us. Read the full article: http://www.boston.com/sports/hockey/bruins...nd_bold/?page=2

Kovalev has several options: First, he can draw the box to him, then dish up top to Streit. Second, he can drift down low and feed Plekanec at the goal line, then cut to the middle for a return pass. Third, he can spot Markov going back-door and fire a cross-ice pass. Fourth, he can draw the defenders to the boards, then dump the puck to Kostitsyn in front. Fifth, he can attack the box directly by coming off the boards with the puck into the middle of the ice, where he can shoot or wait for the defense to collapse on him.

Kovalev, who recorded 47 of his 84 regular-season points on the power play, has been too stationary at times. His teammates, in turn, have stood around and waited for Kovalev to pull off the impossible, allowing the Bruins to negate their primary weapon.

"They're a skilled team," said Jeremy Reich. "If you give them a space, they're going to find it. We've got to limit the plays we give them and make sure we're bearing down on every chance to get it out."

When Kovalev has the puck, the penalty killers' first job is to keep the winger on the perimeter against the boards. Julien has emphasized the middle of the ice, in both even-strength and power-play situations, and the Bruins have had their sticks in any passing lanes that might open up.

But if one of the penalty-killing forwards steers Kovalev up or down the wall, the other forward must be ready to seal off the seam, marking either Kostitsyn in the slot or Markov at the far post.

"The middle guy is so important," said Glen Metropolit, who usually kills penalties with P.J. Axelsson. "You've got to trust him for that seam pass.

"I think that's what it comes down to - trust in each guy. Everyone's got to do their job. Earlier in the year, we weren't doing so well. But I think guys are trying to take care of their own responsibilities."

The Bruins ran into discipline problems late in Game 2. Reich was called for holding at 12:50 of the third period. Metropolit was nabbed for tripping. Shawn Thornton clipped forward Tom Kostopoulos in the face, drawing a four-minute high-sticking double minor. Then in overtime, Reich tripped Markov, setting up Kovalev's game-winner.

They were far more trustworthy Sunday, when they gave the Canadiens only four power plays. On the occasions they had men in the penalty box, the Bruins blocked shots, poked sticks in lanes, hounded Kovalev, and relied on Thomas - it's often said that the goalie is the biggest component of a penalty kill - to keep the Canadiens from converting.

"It's a bunch of things," Andrew Ference said. "It's tough to really point to one thing.

"In the playoffs, there's more attention to detail and more intensity. You know how quickly a goal on the power play can change an entire game. You treat it almost like it's the last minute of the game.

"It's that kind of intensity. That kind of importance is placed on it."

Exactly, especially:

Kovalev, who recorded 47 of his 84 regular-season points on the power play, has been too stationary at times. His teammates, in turn, have stood around and waited for Kovalev to pull off the impossible, allowing the Bruins to negate their primary weapon.

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Guest captainjack22

why do we want grabovski in the line up, we lost last game cause we got push around and were waiting for boston to retreive the puck in the corners and Grabovski isnt a digger or a forechecker, he a offensive guy who gets pushed around alot. I say tweak the team a little, Brezzer for o'Byrne and if Boullion is ready to go then throw him in the mix and put striet up front, bench Lats for the game, and change up the lines a lil'.

Pleks and The Kost. bros,

Higgins Ryder and KOvy,

Dandy, streit, and lappiere

and smoke, begin, and Kostop

Markov-Komi

Hammer-O'Byrne

Georges-Boullion

I dont even know if I'd take Breezer out, hes played good so far but O'Byrne gives us more size and power

I guess thats up to Carbo

Go Habs Go!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Guest habsfan321
Pleks and The Kost. bros,

Higgins Ryder and KOvy,

Dandy, streit, and lappiere

and smoke, begin, and Kostop

Markov-Komi

Hammer-O'Byrne

Georges-Boullion

Your gonna bench Latendresse?

Anyway, I'd rather see:

Kovalev-Plekanec-A. Kostitsyn

Higgins-S. Kostitsyn-Latendresse

Dandenault-Lapierre- Stuwart

Smolinski-Begin-Kostopolis

Markov-Komisarek

Hamerlik-O'Byrne

Georges-Boullion

*I might be crazy benching Streit but it will shake up the team. On the powerplay, we can use Markov/Komisarek + S. Kostitsyn/Hamerlik

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Guest King-Carey-31

Here is what my lineup would look like...keep in mind i am not a coach, and this may prove why.

Kovy - Pleks - A.Kost

Higgins - S.Kost - Lats

Dandy - Begin - kosto

Laps - smoke - streit

Markov - Hammer

Komi - Gorges

O'byrne - Boullion

PRICE

Pressbox - Ryder, Grabs, Stewart, Koivu(IR), Breezer

This enables us to keep our grind line together, move streit up front, keep smoke in the middle and rearrange the back end.

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Guest CanadianMike
So how do people plan on celebrating when we eliminate the Bruins Thursday?

party downtown in the streets of Montreal like last time Habs eliminated the bruins :P

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Guest captainjack22
Your gonna bench Latendresse?

Anyway, I'd rather see:

Kovalev-Plekanec-A. Kostitsyn

Higgins-S. Kostitsyn-Latendresse

Dandenault-Lapierre- Stuwart

Smolinski-Begin-Kostopolis

Markov-Komisarek

Hamerlik-O'Byrne

Georges-Boullion

*I might be crazy benching Streit but it will shake up the team. On the powerplay, we can use Markov/Komisarek + S. Kostitsyn/Hamerlik

Yes I would bench Lats, I dont know what peoples obsession is with the guy, no way I'd take Lats over Dandy or Ryder.

Please someone tell me why Latendresse is such a hero in montreal(except the fact that he is french-canadian). Can we name one good thing he has done in the last 2 months, and have nothing against french people, I love Dandy, Begin and Lapierre.

And you would bench Streit???????O.K. we all have our reasons

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Guest LarryRobinson
So how do people plan on celebrating when we eliminate the Bruins Thursday?

You are setting yourself up for some disappointment my friend. One game at a time. Tonight is anything but a foregone conclusion.

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Guest ryanrdt
You are setting yourself up for some disappointment my friend. One game at a time. Tonight is anything but a foregone conclusion.

Agreed man.....just like Demers during the final moments of 93.....sit down, calm down and don't get over enthused!

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Guest 1stroundpick

Breezer should have sat out last game seeing it was a back to back. I dont think he played all that well. He stood up on the blue line a few times and I was sure that he was going to get burnt.

Breezer out O'byrne in. Kovalev will get going but his linemates have to be more of a threat right now for it to happen. Bruins are overplaying Kovy on the PP but Kostitsyn isnt taking advantage of the room he has to make a play to the net.

I kinda have an inkling to put Higgins on with Pleks and Kovy and let the Kostisyns play together .

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Guest hablover
Yes I would bench Lats, I dont know what peoples obsession is with the guy, no way I'd take Lats over Dandy or Ryder.

Please someone tell me why Latendresse is such a hero in montreal(except the fact that he is french-canadian). Can we name one good thing he has done in the last 2 months, and have nothing against french people, I love Dandy, Begin and Lapierre.

And you would bench Streit???????O.K. we all have our reasons

True...Lats is someone who i have never been impressed with.

I'm not sure if it is because he is too slow for our style of play but I don't think he will amount to much as a player. I won't though be insulted if you quote me on that and burn me in 5 years when he is a superstar....i would love to be wrong, but I really can't see him improving that much more.

I like Dandy, i really do, he just seems like a classy guy who puts his heart in the game night in and out. I just think Carbo prefers Lats over Dandy and thats why Dandy might sit.

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Guest Innis_Mor
.... we lost last game cause we got push around

absolutely incorrect -- The Bruins were far too busy going after the puck. Lucic and Chara are big guys on our little TV screens and if they throw a couple of checks in the game people think the Big Bad Bruins are back. That's not at all what happened last game.

(take a look at their roster -- they got a whole bunch of 177-193lb players that musta been holding watermelons when they were weighed:

http://bruins.nhl.com/team/app?service=pag...amp;type=roster

.... we lost last game cause we .... were waiting for Boston to retrieve the puck in the corners

absolutely correct -- the Bruins wanted the puck and they went and got it -- all night

_______________________________________________________________________________

My opinions / how I saw it. Habs need nothing more than some guys who are willing to go get the puck. Their talent (whatever the line-up) is far in advance of Boston's that the rest will take care of itself.

Bruins have about 3-4 forwards that are about Grabs' size. Savard anyone? Metroplit? Sobotka? Come on!!!! Will someone please tell me what these guys have that is so big and bad-***** that the Habs need to bring is some monsters to handle them? "Grabs will get all pushed around", unlike these guys? It's hockey gang. If you are quick and you get to the puck fast, they can't catch you, and they can't hit you, they can't push you around. They just fish the puck out of the back of their own net when they finally catch up!

How in the world does anyone think the Habs won the Eastern Conference in the regular season for crying out loud!! :blink:

:rolleyes: Now the Habs have to go around trying to be something else in order to score a couple of goals against the "pesky" Bruins?

I don't see Pittsburgh and Dallas worrying a whole lot about "getting pushed around". Why? Because they are far too busy going getting the puck and putting it in the opponent's net!!

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Guest hablover

Exactly...we got beat because we didn't win any battles for the puck, they beat us for all the pucks and we were too worried about getting hit instead of getting the puck or getting the puck out of our zone....

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Guest ucandoit10
A Boston Globe article highlighting our PP and the Bruins effectiveness at limiting us. Read the full article: http://www.boston.com/sports/hockey/bruins...nd_bold/?page=2

Kovalev has several options: First, he can draw the box to him, then dish up top to Streit. Second, he can drift down low and feed Plekanec at the goal line, then cut to the middle for a return pass. Third, he can spot Markov going back-door and fire a cross-ice pass. Fourth, he can draw the defenders to the boards, then dump the puck to Kostitsyn in front. Fifth, he can attack the box directly by coming off the boards with the puck into the middle of the ice, where he can shoot or wait for the defense to collapse on him.

Kovalev, who recorded 47 of his 84 regular-season points on the power play, has been too stationary at times. His teammates, in turn, have stood around and waited for Kovalev to pull off the impossible, allowing the Bruins to negate their primary weapon.

"They're a skilled team," said Jeremy Reich. "If you give them a space, they're going to find it. We've got to limit the plays we give them and make sure we're bearing down on every chance to get it out."

When Kovalev has the puck, the penalty killers' first job is to keep the winger on the perimeter against the boards. Julien has emphasized the middle of the ice, in both even-strength and power-play situations, and the Bruins have had their sticks in any passing lanes that might open up.

But if one of the penalty-killing forwards steers Kovalev up or down the wall, the other forward must be ready to seal off the seam, marking either Kostitsyn in the slot or Markov at the far post.

"The middle guy is so important," said Glen Metropolit, who usually kills penalties with P.J. Axelsson. "You've got to trust him for that seam pass.

"I think that's what it comes down to - trust in each guy. Everyone's got to do their job. Earlier in the year, we weren't doing so well. But I think guys are trying to take care of their own responsibilities."

The Bruins ran into discipline problems late in Game 2. Reich was called for holding at 12:50 of the third period. Metropolit was nabbed for tripping. Shawn Thornton clipped forward Tom Kostopoulos in the face, drawing a four-minute high-sticking double minor. Then in overtime, Reich tripped Markov, setting up Kovalev's game-winner.

They were far more trustworthy Sunday, when they gave the Canadiens only four power plays. On the occasions they had men in the penalty box, the Bruins blocked shots, poked sticks in lanes, hounded Kovalev, and relied on Thomas - it's often said that the goalie is the biggest component of a penalty kill - to keep the Canadiens from converting.

"It's a bunch of things," Andrew Ference said. "It's tough to really point to one thing.

"In the playoffs, there's more attention to detail and more intensity. You know how quickly a goal on the power play can change an entire game. You treat it almost like it's the last minute of the game.

"It's that kind of intensity. That kind of importance is placed on it."

Interesting analysis. One other thing I did notice is that the bruins are much more aggressive on the PP and they are staying high on the point to limit Streit and Markov getting shots to the net. Similar to how Calgary plays the PK. What this says to me is that there need to be more puck movement to find the open man or shots from different angles.

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Guest GoHabsGo57
Exactly...we got beat because we didn't win any battles for the puck, they beat us for all the pucks and we were too worried about getting hit instead of getting the puck or getting the puck out of our zone....

I think they wanted to lose Game 3, so they can actually try tonight, and possibly win the series Thursday at home.

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Guest Innis_Mor
Exactly...we got beat because we didn't win any battles for the puck, they beat us for all the pucks and we were too worried about getting hit instead of getting the puck or getting the puck out of our zone....
Exactly. Habs don't need to be be big and hit to win pucks. They won pucks all season by committing to getting their first and by battling for it when it was a tie to the puck.

"Just go get the puck!"

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Guest AlexK

One thing to note is the Habs have been outshot all season long. That is nothing new for this team. They usually convert their chances more often then the other team does which is why they have won a lot of games. Another thing to note is that even though this team has more offensive talent then Boston if you take away the 8 wins against Boston during the regular season Boston actually has 2 more wins against the rest of the NHL then the Habs do.

With that said Go Habs Go

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