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Your Nhl First Pick. Crosby Or Ovechkin?


tomto

1st round pick  

47 members have voted

  1. 1. You have the first pick, who do you chose?

    • Ovechkin
      37
    • Crosby
      10


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Ovechkin and in my mind it isn't even close.

Crosby may shatter Gretzky's point record and be a generational talent and be the mark of a generation of hockey players.

But as a GM you look at the scarcity and it is very hard to find high scoring left wingers, other than Zetterberg the only other real notable is Havlat and he only plays 30 games a year. Premier left wingers are so scarce compared to premier centers.

The other thing is the pure goal scoring talent. It is so much harder to find goal scorers than playmakers. Crosby's acceleration is among the elite if not the best, but if he has a 6th gear, then Ovechkin has a very deceptive 5th gear and for at least 20 extra goals a year if not more its worth it.

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Here are some Tid Bits on Alexander Ovechkin:

"When the team sent him his first contract, he refused to sign it and mail it back. He wanted to ink the deal in the presence of GM George McPhee so he could shake his hand and thank him. Less than three years later, the Caps won the Southeast. What did Ovechkin do to reform Washington? Scoring 163 goals in three seasons helped. So did his infectious spirit, which energized the franchise.

Ovechkin will answer the phone at 3 a.m.—it's called accountability. "He's the first guy at the computer after the game, wanting to see his shifts," says coach Bruce Boudreau. "He wants to think about the game. If he doesn't understand something, he makes sure he gets it right."

Ovechkin has so much energy he's practically radioactive. On the ice, he moves from zone to zone so quickly that linemates struggle to keep up. In the locker room, he darts around like a horsefly. After the Caps won the Southeast last season, Ovechkin pulled a freshly printed championship T-shirt over his dress shirt and announced he was going out on the town. D-man Mike Green shot him a no-way-I'm-going-out-like-that look but joined the party after forwards Alexander Semin and Sergei Fedorov copied Ovie. "He's full of life," says Caps captain Chris Clark. "Gets everybody going, jumping around. We ask how he does it, and he says, 'I don't know what I do, I just do!'" In Ovechkin, the Caps have a leader who is ready to roll up his sleeves, a star who is still a working stiff.

Every leader needs a climactic story point that illustrates his character. For Ovechkin, it's a game in Pittsburgh last season when he took a skate to the leg and left the Igloo with a six-inch gash. None of the Caps would have blamed him for returning to DC to heal, but Ovechkin traveled with the team to Ottawa and played two nights later, scoring four goals and an assist in an 8-6 win. "Every time he moved, the stitches opened," says Boudreau. "And he played through it."

Ovechkin brought that style to America, taking command of the game when necessary but cheering just as loudly for a teammate's blocked shot as for a goal. Before a shootout in Pittsburgh in January, Ovechkin gave teammate Quintin Laing a high-five for critical late-game blocks, then picked up the puck and scored. Ovechkin also calls Caps brass repeatedly during the summer to make sure contract negotiations with teammates and free agents move quickly. And for good measure, he has decorated his BMW M6 with a Caps flag.

After he collected his four trophies for the 2007-08 season—Hart (the team's first league MVP), Lester B. Pearson (the players' MVP), Maurice Richard (most goals) and Art Ross (most points)—Ovechkin told Leonsis he would trade all four for one Cup.

"We think we can be good," says Laich. "We aren't afraid of anybody. We're very curious to see how good we can be." Ovechkin already knows: "Washington can do the same as Pittsburgh, except we'll win the Cup." Even Detroit coach Mike Babcock is convinced, telling Leonsis, "No one wants to play you guys." You know change has come when enemies are believers.

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/espnmag/story?se...&id=3604260

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Ovechkin is the more skilled player, but he's a one man show. If I have a crappy team and want someone to make them bearable: Ovechkin, no competition. If I want to win a cup and sign talent to surround him with, Crosby. I just feel Crosby is better at making his teammates better players.

The biggest knock on Crosby and the reason he'll never be Gretzky is he isn't a particularly good goalscorer. And while he'll be a generational talent, the lack of scoring will prevent him from being thought of in the same way as Gretzky and Lemieux. Probably Lindros and Jagr will be better comparisons in terms of how good they were.

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The biggest knock on Crosby and the reason he'll never be Gretzky is he isn't a particularly good goalscorer. And while he'll be a generational talent, the lack of scoring will prevent him from being thought of in the same way as Gretzky and Lemieux. Probably Lindros and Jagr will be better comparisons in terms of how good they were.

Define "particularly good goalscorer," because he did score 39 goals as an 18 year old in the NHL and obviously has the potential to score 50+ in his prime. He's maybe not as much of a natural goal scorer as some guys, and he's definitely not in the Gretzky/Mario class (Or even Ovechkin class for that matter) but he's capable of being a 50+ goal guy imo.

But coming from the perspective of building an NHL club, I would chose Crosby because strength down the middle is the priority.

Agreed on that point. I would take Crosby and I don't even think it's that hard. Let's not forget Crosby is still basically 2 full years younger, which is a substantial gap when you're talking about development at that age group.

Right now obviously the majority will remember last year when Crosby spent a lot of time hurt, and Ovechkin played 82 games, lead his team into the playoffs and won the Hart if this question was asked after 06-07, the majority would probably say Crosby. Let's also remember, last year despite the injury Crosby still scored at about the same points pergame clip that Ovechkin did.

I get the impression when I watch both of them play that as great as Ovechkin is, Crosby will have a considerably longer career, Ovechkin relies a lot on natural skills more then Crosby, being faster, stronger ect then the opposition, his style may also lead him to more serious injuries like a Pavel Bure... Crosby is the kind of guy who could still be scoring 80-90 points into his late 30's like Wayne. That's nothing but an opinion though so take it for what it's worth.

When you consider, position, potential, age, career to this point and ability to make those around him better I think Crosby is the hands down selection.

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Define "particularly good goalscorer," because he did score 39 goals as an 18 year old in the NHL and obviously has the potential to score 50+ in his prime. He's maybe not as much of a natural goal scorer as some guys, and he's definitely not in the Gretzky/Mario class (Or even Ovechkin class for that matter) but he's capable of being a 50+ goal guy imo.

Agreed on that point. I would take Crosby and I don't even think it's that hard. Let's not forget Crosby is still basically 2 full years younger, which is a substantial gap when you're talking about development at that age group.

Right now obviously the majority will remember last year when Crosby spent a lot of time hurt, and Ovechkin played 82 games, lead his team into the playoffs and won the Hart if this question was asked after 06-07, the majority would probably say Crosby. Let's also remember, last year despite the injury Crosby still scored at about the same points pergame clip that Ovechkin did.

I get the impression when I watch both of them play that as great as Ovechkin is, Crosby will have a considerably longer career, Ovechkin relies a lot on natural skills more then Crosby, being faster, stronger ect then the opposition, his style may also lead him to more serious injuries like a Pavel Bure... Crosby is the kind of guy who could still be scoring 80-90 points into his late 30's like Wayne. That's nothing but an opinion though so take it for what it's worth.

When you consider, position, potential, age, career to this point and ability to make those around him better I think Crosby is the hands down selection.

I agree with you alot but I'd still choose Ovechkin. I don't know why but when I see him, I just feel that somethings going to happen. Maybe it's 'cause he has that smile and exciting nature or 'cause he's usually flying down the ice and hitting people. It's a hard question tho

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Here are some Tid Bits on Alexander Ovechkin:

"When the team sent him his first contract, he refused to sign it and mail it back. He wanted to ink the deal in the presence of GM George McPhee so he could shake his hand and thank him. Less than three years later, the Caps won the Southeast. What did Ovechkin do to reform Washington? Scoring 163 goals in three seasons helped. So did his infectious spirit, which energized the franchise.

Ovechkin will answer the phone at 3 a.m.—it's called accountability. "He's the first guy at the computer after the game, wanting to see his shifts," says coach Bruce Boudreau. "He wants to think about the game. If he doesn't understand something, he makes sure he gets it right."

Ovechkin has so much energy he's practically radioactive. On the ice, he moves from zone to zone so quickly that linemates struggle to keep up. In the locker room, he darts around like a horsefly. After the Caps won the Southeast last season, Ovechkin pulled a freshly printed championship T-shirt over his dress shirt and announced he was going out on the town. D-man Mike Green shot him a no-way-I'm-going-out-like-that look but joined the party after forwards Alexander Semin and Sergei Fedorov copied Ovie. "He's full of life," says Caps captain Chris Clark. "Gets everybody going, jumping around. We ask how he does it, and he says, 'I don't know what I do, I just do!'" In Ovechkin, the Caps have a leader who is ready to roll up his sleeves, a star who is still a working stiff.

Every leader needs a climactic story point that illustrates his character. For Ovechkin, it's a game in Pittsburgh last season when he took a skate to the leg and left the Igloo with a six-inch gash. None of the Caps would have blamed him for returning to DC to heal, but Ovechkin traveled with the team to Ottawa and played two nights later, scoring four goals and an assist in an 8-6 win. "Every time he moved, the stitches opened," says Boudreau. "And he played through it."

Ovechkin brought that style to America, taking command of the game when necessary but cheering just as loudly for a teammate's blocked shot as for a goal. Before a shootout in Pittsburgh in January, Ovechkin gave teammate Quintin Laing a high-five for critical late-game blocks, then picked up the puck and scored. Ovechkin also calls Caps brass repeatedly during the summer to make sure contract negotiations with teammates and free agents move quickly. And for good measure, he has decorated his BMW M6 with a Caps flag.

After he collected his four trophies for the 2007-08 season—Hart (the team's first league MVP), Lester B. Pearson (the players' MVP), Maurice Richard (most goals) and Art Ross (most points)—Ovechkin told Leonsis he would trade all four for one Cup.

"We think we can be good," says Laich. "We aren't afraid of anybody. We're very curious to see how good we can be." Ovechkin already knows: "Washington can do the same as Pittsburgh, except we'll win the Cup." Even Detroit coach Mike Babcock is convinced, telling Leonsis, "No one wants to play you guys." You know change has come when enemies are believers.

Source: http://sports.espn.go.com/espnmag/story?se...&id=3604260

Thanks for this. Good read.

For me it's Ovechkin, for all those reasons and more. He's the more complete player. And he's a player's player, a coach's player, an owner's player, a fan's player. He's the best thing that has happened to hockey in a good while.

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Define "particularly good goalscorer," because he did score 39 goals as an 18 year old in the NHL and obviously has the potential to score 50+ in his prime. He's maybe not as much of a natural goal scorer as some guys, and he's definitely not in the Gretzky/Mario class (Or even Ovechkin class for that matter) but he's capable of being a 50+ goal guy imo.

Yes, he started with 39 goals, which would have been fine had he been able to build on it; but it went down the next 2 years. It's possible he'll score 50 at some point, but I doubt it's the norm and he may never reach that plateau.

Now of course it's all relevant, 30-40 goals from a player is great. But in the context of franchise players, his goalscoring is a drawback.

Crosby is an amazing player, but as far as guys who get the "franchise" label attached to them go, his goalscoring isn't great.

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