Jump to content
The Official Site of the Montréal Canadiens
Canadiens de Montreal

Five More Khl Players Diagnosed With Heart Defects


Recommended Posts

MOSCOW -- Heart defects have been found in five players in the Russian ice hockey league since the death of rising star Alexei Cherepanov, an official said Wednesday.

Russia's Continental Hockey League ordered the tests after Cherepanov, 19, collapsed and died last month from a heart condition while playing for his club Avangard.

Cherepanov was a New York Rangers draft pick.

Russian league spokesman Marat Safin said 49 players have undergone testing with their clubs, and five turned out to have problems.

He said that figure could rise because 18 players are still to be checked. Results from the total sample of 67 players are expected Friday.

Safin said there was no reason to suspect any form of drug abuse or doping among the players.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=3697719

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't know if someone's posted this yet, but I found this on TSN.ca

MOSCOW - Heart defects have been found in five players from Russia's Continental Hockey League since the death of rising star Alexei Cherepanov, an official said Wednesday.

The league ordered the tests after the 19-year-old Cherepanov collapsed and died last month from a heart condition while playing for his club Avangard.

Cherepanov was a New York Rangers draft pick.

Russian league spokesman Marat Safin said 49 players have undergone testing with their clubs, and five turned out to have problems.

He said that figure could rise because 18 players are still to be checked. Results from the total sample of 67 players are expected Friday.

Safin said there was no reason to suspect any form of drug abuse or doping among the players.

SOURCE: http://tsn.ca/nhl/story/?id=255596&lid...s=headlines_nhl

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MOSCOW -- Heart defects have been found in five players in the Russian ice hockey league since the death of rising star Alexei Cherepanov, an official said Wednesday.

Russia's Continental Hockey League ordered the tests after Cherepanov, 19, collapsed and died last month from a heart condition while playing for his club Avangard.

Cherepanov was a New York Rangers draft pick.

Russian league spokesman Marat Safin said 49 players have undergone testing with their clubs, and five turned out to have problems.

He said that figure could rise because 18 players are still to be checked. Results from the total sample of 67 players are expected Friday.

Safin said there was no reason to suspect any form of drug abuse or doping among the players.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nhl/news/story?id=3697719

This is getting scarier by the minute...HOPEFULLY someone can figure out why this sort of thing is going on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is odd. You expect a couple, but this number is far too large. I don't even know that steroids can explain this large a percentage of them.
I think part of the explanation can be attributed to bad journalism... can anyone here tell me how Russian league spokesman Marat Safin is defining 'heart defects'?... that's something I would like to know...

Can this still be fallout from Chernoble ? I don't know if I spelled that correctly.
that's a very interesting hypothesis... is it possible the old Soviet regime downplayed the area that was affected and people unknowingly continued to live in unsafe areas?...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think part of the explanation can be attributed to bad journalism... can anyone here tell me how Russian league spokesman Marat Safin is defining 'heart defects'?... that's something I would like to know...
Largely just that, Wayne. If their health and safety organization is poor, who's to say their media, PR, heart testing procedures, and data evaluation skills are any better?

Are the same people running the same tests on NHL players at the same time? Who knows ... maybe this group's results on them would be the same, or better, .... or worse? ;)

I'll just file this one under "ignore" for now. Likely be a blurb tomorrow that the "machine was set for "gorilla" instead of "hockey player" so they're going to start over. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can this still be fallout from Chernoble ? I don't know if I spelled that correctly.

I know my wife's hometown still brings kids over who suffer from what that disaster has had on the environment.

After all these years it is still causing birth defects and other health issues.

I can't see that for a number of reasons:

- none of the players are from the direct vicinity of the disaster (Ukraine)

- while the radiation cloud went over Russia, it also went over first world countries in Europe and even as far as North America. You'd think if the Russians could figure out there were health issues, countries with advanced health care such as Finland would have noticed and reported these problems

- I'm not a doctor, but I'm not sure heart defects would be a usual side effect to excessive radiation exposure

- the proven number of people who have died from Chernobyl is very low: people working at the plant, firefighters, and unfortunately I think there were 7 kids who got thyroid cancer. There hasn't been much proven beyond these directly attributed to Chernobyl

Link to comment
Share on other sites

you're probably right about the (non-)Chernobyl connection... but I wanted to ask about one thing you said:

- none of the players are from the direct vicinity of the disaster (Ukraine)
where did you get that from, i.e. were the players who were tested made known? or is it that you know that no KHL players are from the region and so you made the logical extension?...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

you're probably right about the (non-)Chernobyl connection... but I wanted to ask about one thing you said:

where did you get that from, i.e. were the players who were tested made known? or is it that you know that no KHL players are from the region and so you made the logical extension?...

okay it's an assumption, Ukraine isn't a huge country for producing hockey players and I think the KHL is mostly Russians. And if all the players turning up with conditions were from around the same area, I think we'd here something about that.

I shouldn't have used the word "none" though,, I should have said "I assume at most a couple would have been from the direct country". But even so, and I'm not an expert on this, but from what I've heard other than some people right in Chernobyl, there's been no connections between the accident and any illnesses,even in Ukraine, but I may be remembering wrongly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

okay it's an assumption, Ukraine isn't a huge country for producing hockey players and I think the KHL is mostly Russians. And if all the players turning up with conditions were from around the same area, I think we'd here something about that.

I shouldn't have used the word "none" though,, I should have said "I assume at most a couple would have been from the direct country". But even so, and I'm not an expert on this, but from what I've heard other than some people right in Chernobyl, there's been no connections between the accident and any illnesses,even in Ukraine, but I may be remembering wrongly.

I was just wondering if you knew how they selected the players to be tested, if it was completely random or if they had some sort of criteria... maybe the KHL testers were looking for something in their subjects that they thought would lead to finding a problem... for example, the reason there continue to be so many failed doping tests at the Tour de France is because some of the testing is not random, they 'target' suspected cheats...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

uh? I hope your kidding... lol we all know what's going on, they take steroids at 15 and 16 years old.

We don't know for certain that is the actual reason.

Can this still be fallout from Chernoble ? I don't know if I spelled that correctly.

I know my wife's hometown still brings kids over who suffer from what that disaster has had on the environment.

After all these years it is still causing birth defects and other health issues.

I was wondering that also

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't see that for a number of reasons:

- none of the players are from the direct vicinity of the disaster (Ukraine)

- while the radiation cloud went over Russia, it also went over first world countries in Europe and even as far as North America. You'd think if the Russians could figure out there were health issues, countries with advanced health care such as Finland would have noticed and reported these problems

- I'm not a doctor, but I'm not sure heart defects would be a usual side effect to excessive radiation exposure

- the proven number of people who have died from Chernobyl is very low: people working at the plant, firefighters, and unfortunately I think there were 7 kids who got thyroid cancer. There hasn't been much proven beyond these directly attributed to Chernobyl

I do not profess to know if these players conditions are attributable to Chernobyl, but I must disagree with what I have put in bold.

As I stated before, my wifes hometown bring kids from that area over every summer, and all of them have issues directly related to that disaster.

The environment is still tainted as most of the kids that are coming now were not alive when it happened. Their doctors in Russia, as well as ours here in Canada attribute it to the Chernobyl disaster.

Again, not that this has any correlation to these young hockey players.

I wonder how the ratio of 5 in a sample of around 50 compares to other parts of the world.

In Canada would it be drastically lower, like say 5 in a sample of 1,000 ?

I wonder if anyone knows.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

[/b]

I do not profess to know if these players conditions are attributable to Chernobyl, but I must disagree with what I have put in bold.

As I stated before, my wifes hometown bring kids from that area over every summer, and all of them have issues directly related to that disaster.

The environment is still tainted as most of the kids that are coming now were not alive when it happened. Their doctors in Russia, as well as ours here in Canada attribute it to the Chernobyl disaster.

Again, not that this has any correlation to these young hockey players.

I wonder how the ratio of 5 in a sample of around 50 compares to other parts of the world.

In Canada would it be drastically lower, like say 5 in a sample of 1,000 ?

I wonder if anyone knows.

A lot of the problems of the heart can be attributed to foods. Alot of the foods we eat now are alot more processed with a greater deal of sodium content and chemical residual than in previous generations. As a result a lot more young people are developing conditions that have traditionally belonged to people of an older age category (Heart disease, cancer, kidney failure, etc.)...Someone said the reason for these defects is because they are being pumped full of steroids...While I don't disagree entirely with that thought, the idea I would pose to that person is that the defect may very well be a result of say; Chicken; ingested through the body on a regular basis that had been pumped full of steroids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:lol: very funny.

2 of my friends play in europe and they told me they basically never saw anyone who wasn't taking some kind of steroids.

Maybe your friend's a liar...Maybe you are.

Now before you jump all over me for both of those statements, please understand: I'm not calling into question neither you or your friend's character. And while you may very well be bang on in your assessment, there's something that doesn't add up. If Cherepanov was taking steroids, wouldn't he have at least been just a little bit bulkier? The boy was a been pole!

I realize the diet thing is more of a far fetched conspiracy theory at best, But Alexei Cherepanov looked the least like a steroid case of anyone I've ever seen...He looked more like a starving sickly refugee.

I guess the point I'm trying to make is, until we have actual facts, you can't simply say it's one thing...Nor can you rule ANY scenario out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

an update..

http://ca.sports.yahoo.com/nhl/news;_ylt=A...p&type=lgns

Panel: On-site personnel not at fault in death

MOSCOW (AP)—Emergency medical personnel acted properly in treating hockey prospect Alexei Cherepanov after he collapsed during a game last month, a preliminary league investigation found Friday.

Cherepanov died soon after he collapsed.

Continental Hockey League vice president of operations Vladimir Shalaev said the inquiry would continue.

“They acted professionally and did everything they could. The absence of special medical equipment in the arena was not the cause of death of this hockey player,” Shalaev said. “This does not mean, however, that the charges pending will be dismissed nor does it mean that there will be no disciplinary action against these individuals.”

The 19-year-old Cherepanov, a top prospect of the New York Rangers, collapsed Oct. 13 while on the bench during a game outside Moscow. Regional investigators have said Cherepanov apparently had chronic ischemia—a medical condition that means not enough blood gets to the heart or other organs. They have raised questions as to why the condition went undetected.

“A comprehensive forensic study, conducted by additional medical specialists, is under way to more deeply and thoroughly analyze the case,” Shalaev said. “We will not be able to share the cause of death of Alexei Cherepanov until this examination is completed in full. Once the (league) receives the results of a comprehensive forensic examination, they will be made public, and any further individuals found to be negligent will be identified.”

During the November break in the Continental League’s schedule, 67 players under the age of 20 were given medical exams. The examinations uncovered concerns with the health of five athletes.

Of this group, it appears that one or two young hockey players may have significant health concerns and may have to change their careers,” Shalaev said. “The (league) has an obligation to these young men not to endanger their health in any way.”

All data from the examinations will be transferred to the clubs’ medical staffs.

- 30 -

still a little light on details, but it does show how ridiculous that first item was -- it was simply sensationalistic, with almost no solid information... still no explanation of what they mean by 'heart defect', but it appears broad enough that it is very serious for one or two, but not for the others...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Blood doping can be very effective, particularly (mostly?) for endurance sports. Professional (and amateur) cyclists have been involved in it for years (Europeans, Americans). For safety, and for maximal effectiveness, it should be supervised by a knowledgeable person, ideally a medically trained one. If not, you aren't just flaunting lack morals/ethics, you 're risking your health / life.

For a decent story and a layman's outline on blood doping (straight blood, and EPO), I'd recommend "From Lance to Landis", a book neither American cyclist is very fond of. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...