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Help From My Bilingual, Francophone Friends


camayne

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Hey. As you probably would have guessed, I'm from New Jersey, and have never spoken another language than English. I'm taking Italian classes in High School (only Italian and Spanish were offered), but I'm really not learning much. I'm in my Junior year and I only know words that I shout out in class when people get an answer wrong or something, I can't even say a sentence. More than anything I want to learn to fluently speak French, but since I plan on moving to Montreal later in life potentially, I was wondering. If I take French classes in college in two years, and I learn to speak it fluently, is the dialect spoken in Montreal that different? Would I struggle with understanding, speaking, or reading anything written about the Canadiens, for instance?

Any other advice? Coming from a kid who doesn't speak any other languages at all, is French extremely difficult to learn?

Thanks everyone.

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Hey. As you probably would have guessed, I'm from New Jersey, and have never spoken another language than English. I'm taking Italian classes in High School (only Italian and Spanish were offered), but I'm really not learning much. I'm in my Junior year and I only know words that I shout out in class when people get an answer wrong or something, I can't even say a sentence. More than anything I want to learn to fluently speak French, but since I plan on moving to Montreal later in life potentially, I was wondering. If I take French classes in college in two years, and I learn to speak it fluently, is the dialect spoken in Montreal that different? Would I struggle with understanding, speaking, or reading anything written about the Canadiens, for instance?

Any other advice? Coming from a kid who doesn't speak any other languages at all, is French extremely difficult to learn?

Thanks everyone.

I'm in high school and I find french very hard to learn but I think that's because I don't like it and I don't work hard enough. I think French can be alot easier if you actually want to learn it and if you put in the work to study and that stuff :)

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I'm in high school and I find french very hard to learn but I think that's because I don't like it and I don't work hard enough. I think French can be alot easier if you actually want to learn it and if you put in the work to study and that stuff :)

I actually think it's a problem with our education system itself, as I've learned more french from rds then I have my last 2-3 years of french class. We need to get out and experience french, instead of having the same old, boring lessons shoved down our throat every single year.

To the original poster: learn the basics from a french cd-book combination at your nearest chapters/bookstore. Once you have the knowledge to make small talk, move over here, and learn by experience. That's the best, but not the easiest way. Like mtl said, it's a lot easier if you put in the work.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Although I'm not bilingual (yet) I'm working on it. I'm a Canadian who shares your love for the Habs and the French language. I have French speaking grandparents and have taken French in school since kindergarten, so I've got a bit of an advantage. My advice would be - start learning French NOW! You're still very young and can pick up a lot on your own, the sooner you start the better.

The accent and vocabulary is a bit different in Quebec than in France. The two regions have been relatively isolated for around 250 years so this makes sense. That being said any French you can learn now is a giant advantage. I'd look for an Alliance Francaise near you - they are an international group promoting the French language and culture. You could definetly find some lessons there.

If you want to hear what Quebecoise French sounds like listen in to Radio Canada programs at http://www.radio-canada.ca/radio/

Good Luck!

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Would I struggle with understanding, speaking, or reading anything written about the Canadiens, for instance?

Reading, no.

Speaking, yes. But you'll pick it up.

I was born and raised in Montreal, and took french for about 13 years. Moved to Ontario. Decided to take French as an elective in high-school because well French class in English speaking Canada must be a breeze compared to back home.

It was. The proffessors even taught the French class in English... :huh:

Anyways, the best way to learn French is just listening to it. Watch RDS, French TV, Radio, even watch movies in French with english subtitles...or in English with French subtitles. <--- I've gained way way more from this, than by just sitting in a classroom being bored to death. Apply something that you like and just surround it with French. IE: Habs.

Good way to start. Read articles on the canadiens.com in both languages. Go back and forth compare the meanings. There you go.

Cheers

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for me it's inverse , i learn english langage , i have two hours in the week , and it's with my job . The good solution for a good progress it's the practice , For exemple you can go in french forum of your hobbys ( for exemple , hockey , cars , coocking , your passion ) , and read a news in french ( for exemple looking the hockey news with RDS.CA ) .

in my exemple for learn english i read a christobal huet news in chicagotribune.com , i go in alfa romeo owner forum ( because my favorite car mark it's alfa romeo ) .

my english it isn't perfect but i test improve this langage .

and you have a very good language dictionnary with internet , it's this :

http://www.wordreference.com/

sur ce a+ a tous ;)

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