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Ray Emery


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Big tax hit for Emery. Must'na liked it over there. Gone less than 2 years, means his "tax free" salary there will be nailed by the Canadian government. It'll work out to about a 40% plus hit for him. I am sure he has lots left over still though. :D

"Charachter-wise", are we to presume he's cured, like Avery?

As long as the Habs stay away from him, I don't much care whether he comes back or not.

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Big tax hit for Emery. Must'na liked it over there. Gone less than 2 years, means his "tax free" salary there will be nailed by the Canadian government. It'll work out to about a 40% plus hit for him. I am sure he has lots left over still though. :D

"Charachter-wise", are we to presume he's cured, like Avery?

As long as the Habs stay away from him, I don't much care whether he comes back or not.

Not familiar with Canadian tax laws. Why would money earned in a foreign country be taxable when he came back? The money didnt come from a Canadian company but from whereever he was playing last season. Not saying youre wrong. Just curious is all.

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Not familiar with Canadian tax laws. Why would money earned in a foreign country be taxable when he came back? The money didnt come from a Canadian company but from whereever he was playing last season. Not saying youre wrong. Just curious is all.
He and his advisors may fight it, but CRA will likely claim he never made a "clean break" to become a non-resident of Canada. Their rule of thumb (and it goes back decades) is two years. Canadian residents (and "deemed residents") are taxed on their worldwide income, with credit given for any taxes paid in the foreign jurisdiction. I recall Emery was to be paid "tax free" over there, however that was being achieved. CRA may come after him for tax on all he made for his one season, if he returns.

If someone goes to a tax free jurisdiction to work, they will/should always sign a 2 year contract and aim to stay that long.

Of course, it is just hitting me now, that Emery is very likely going to the U.S., to remain a non-resident of Canada for at least another year. That, I think, would solve it for him. So there you go, he will very likely only sign with a U.S. based team, if he signs with any NHL team.

(Phew!! Leaves Habs out of the running!! :D )

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He and his advisors may fight it, but CRA will likely claim he never made a "clean break" to become a non-resident of Canada. Their rule of thumb (and it goes back decades) is two years.

It has nothing to do with time (other than if you're int he country for more than half the year you're a "deemed resident", you just have to make sure you break all ties (bank accounts, drivers license, health insurance, credit cards, property, family, etc.)

But I assume he was still a resident of Canada all along, I doubt he was planning to live in Russia for five years. Even if he was only coming back here in the offseason, it would be difficult to break all ties.

But from your previous post, coming back into Canada would have nothing to do with it, if he were still a resident he'd be expected to pay that money whether or not he returned here (although I guess it's a little easier to enforce when he's physically here). But I haven't heard anything about him evading taxes, so I assume he's already paid it.

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It has nothing to do with time (other than if you're int he country for more than half the year you're a "deemed resident", you just have to make sure you break all ties (bank accounts, drivers license, health insurance, credit cards, property, family, etc.)

But I assume he was still a resident of Canada all along, I doubt he was planning to live in Russia for five years. Even if he was only coming back here in the offseason, it would be difficult to break all ties.

But from your previous post, coming back into Canada would have nothing to do with it, if he were still a resident he'd be expected to pay that money whether or not he returned here (although I guess it's a little easier to enforce when he's physically here). But I haven't heard anything about him evading taxes, so I assume he's already paid it.

I'm assuming all along on this that he'd organized and severed his residential ties (easy to do, unless dependents are left behind, in Canada). You certainly don't have to break your other (non-dependent) family ties, and you can rent (arm's length) out your property (you're allowed Canadian investments; just have to declare and pay tax on the income). The keys are no homestead, no car parked somewhere to use on visits, no Canadian health insurance, etc.

I realize now that I erred, and you are correct on the time; the two year rule has been dropped. Technically then, if Emery severed his residential ties cleanly when he left, he can move back to Canada and play for a Canadian team after just this one season, and still retain his one year salary earned while away, free of Canadian tax. At 40% plus, I would hope that he made plans that way. But maybe he wouldn't care that much. A lot of dough though to cough up.

If he made a conscientious effort to break his residential ties as he left, he would not need to report any income earned outside Canada while away, and he would not be considered to be evading taxes. It would be up to CRA to (re)assess him on what they considered assessable income.

I do wonder how the residential status works for all the Canadians playing for U.S. based NHL teams. Less of an issue because earned income is taxable for both jurisdictions, but if Canadian rates are higher, a player would rather pay the U.S. taxes (only). I would expect many of them might prefer to maintain Canadian summer homes, families are often stationed in Canada, and additional total tax might be relatively nominal, so it may be likely for many that they don't bother over-planning, and just retain their Canadian residential ties, paying taxes at the higher rate of the two countries (unless there is some pro athlete/entertainer tax treaty between the countries -- wouldn't be surprised if there is).

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Do people think racism was a factor in him not getting a contract last year?

Yes.

How else do you explain him getting blackballed by the rest of the league the year after taking the Sens to the Stanley Cup finals, while Wade "Mr. Cokehead" Redden got a stupid-money contract in New York and Sean Avery is still gainfully employed?

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I would never have given that a thought.

Do you believe this was the case,DA_Chapion?

I didn't even know he was black until I saw someone else raise the possibility elsewhere, so I didn't come up with the notion on my own.

I'm inclined to think hockey has a race problem. The most blatant example is the population of coaches. All white north americans. No russians, no swedes, no finns, no natives AFAIK.

Add what Weep pointed out about second chances. Avery is an ***** and a problem, but he gets a job done so it's all good. Emery also gets a job done.

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IMO the league needs Emery to market the game more to African-Americans, maybe Subban can provide that spark too if he ever makes a good name for himself in the NHL, but right now Emery is a public figure. I hate to follow the NBA/NFL's league of promoting its neanderthals/troublemakers but Emery bring a new demographic of viewers based on his race.

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so I didn't come up with the notion on my own.

Not implying that you did . :D

Just when you asked whether people thought had race played a part in him not getting a contract last yr,was curious to know what you thought of that notion,that's all.

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