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patinwoody

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The HABS have players from all over the globe. Last season we had players from Canada, America, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Finland, Belarus, Russia, Switzerland and recently we signed a player from Sweden. There are other European countries represented through out the NHL, such as Poland, Germany, Norway, Denmark, France, Ukraine, Latvia, and Kazakhstan.

Please let me know if I left out any other countries. (Please give country /player / team).

As for the North American players, it is very interesting to look at the player’s cultural heritage. These players serve as a new generation of role models to look up to. I think hockey’s diversity is growing and it is great for the game.

I made a list of some HABS and other NHL players whose family stem from different parts of the globe. Please feel free to add to the list. I realize ‘we all come from somewhere’, so have fun with it. In some instances, I included a reference to religion, for people who relate & practice the same faith of the NHL player.

At the end of the day, when the puck drops, we are all hockey players and fans of the coolest game on ice!

http://www.nhl.com/ice/page.htm?id=27182

Carey Price : Ulkatcho First Nation Canadian

Georges Laraque: Haitian Canadian

Francis Bouillon: Haitian Canadian American

Thomas Kostopoulos: Greek Canadian

P.K. Subban : Jamaican Canadian

Christos Kostas Tselios (Chris Chelios)/ Detroit Red Wings: Greek American

Mathieu Schneider: Jewish American

José Nicholas Théodore / Washington Capitals: Macedonian Canadian

Roberto Luongo / Vancouver Canucks: Italian Canadian

Mike Ribeiro / Dallas Stars: Portuguese Canadian

Jarome Arthur-Leigh Adekunle Tig Junior Elvis Iginla / Calagary Flames: Nigerian Canadian

Kevin Weekes / New Jersey Devils: Bajan Canadian

Manny Noveen Malhotra / Columbus Blue Jackets : Indian (Punjab) Canadian

Richard Park / NY Islanders : South Korean American

Jordin John Kudluk Tootoo/ Nashville Predators: Inuk Ukranian Canadian

Jonathan Cheechoo / San Jose Sharks : Cree First Nation Canadian

Devin Setoguchi / San Jose Sharks: Japanese Canadian

Paul Tetsuhiko Kariya / St. Louis Blues : Japanese Canadian

Ramzi Abid / Nashvill Predators (2007) : Tunisian Muslim Canadian

Owen Liam Nolan / Minnesota Wild : Irish Canadian

David Johnny Oduya / NJ Devils: Swedish Kenyan

Scott Gomez / NY Rangers : Mexican Columbian American

Álvaro "Al" Montoya / Phoenix Coyotes : Cuban American

Tahir "Tie" Domi / Toronto Maple Leafs (2006) : Albanian Canadian

Eric Lindros / Dallas Stars (2007) : Swedish Canadian

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Okay... what are we suppose to reply to this?

I was just wondering if anybody else knew of other NHL players with diverse cultural back grounds. I'm sure if you were a hockey fan before the 70's, the players of those generations were mainly caucasian north americans. It is nice to see hockey has opened up around the world. Maybe one day, professional hockey can be as universal as soccer.

Here's another link I just found on NHL.com

http://www.nhl.com/ice/page.htm?id=30010

The other facts I got on players were all found on www.wikipedia.org

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I was just wondering if anybody else knew of other NHL players with diverse cultural back grounds. I'm sure if you were a hockey fan before the 70's, the players of those generations were mainly caucasian north americans. It is nice to see hockey has opened up around the world. Maybe one day, professional hockey can be as universal as soccer.

Here's another link I just found on NHL.com

http://www.nhl.com/ice/page.htm?id=30010

The other facts I got on players were all found on www.wikipedia.org

That's only because the money brought them here my friend.

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People make the world go around. One of my favorite things in life is to find out more about an individual whether it's in the workplace, socializing, reading a biography or watching sports. Sports have always brought people of different backgrounds together. I watched a lot of hockey in the seventies and at that time it was an oddity, at least to me, to see a US born hockey player in the NHL. I lost hockey for a little while and one of the biggest changes is the diversity of backgrounds. Personally I do find it fascinating. In the case of the Canadiens however I see the diversity perhaps being detrimental. It would appear that parts of the media are not as receptive to diversity. Maybe I'm wrong and actually I wish I would be wrong.

Interesting subject and thanks for the NHL link. I would not have associated some of those names with the backgrounds indicated.

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Maybe one day, professional hockey can be as universal as soccer.

Lol not until they discover some technology to make equipment and ice much cheaper.

To tell you the truth I'm sick of the NHL marketing hockey to places where it is not a traditional sport, and I'm not talking about the NHL teams down south. I'm talking about making these pseudo feel good charities where people give sticks and what not to poor, mainly hot countries so people can practice the sport. Seeing these stories in the nhl.com website is just infuriating. I mean come on is the NHL that butthurt about hockey not being as popular as soccer? It's such a shame these people are trying to export such culture (expensive culture) to places like thailand, where the standard of living is so much lower and where it is completely unfriendly to the environment to have a bunch of skating rinks.

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Lol not until they discover some technology to make equipment and ice much cheaper.

To tell you the truth I'm sick of the NHL marketing hockey to places where it is not a traditional sport, and I'm not talking about the NHL teams down south. I'm talking about making these pseudo feel good charities where people give sticks and what not to poor, mainly hot countries so people can practice the sport. Seeing these stories in the nhl.com website is just infuriating. I mean come on is the NHL that butthurt about hockey not being as popular as soccer? It's such a shame these people are trying to export such culture (expensive culture) to places like thailand, where the standard of living is so much lower and where it is completely unfriendly to the environment to have a bunch of skating rinks.

You can always play street hockey. And you don't have a ball, you can always use a coconut. :blink:

Jamaican bobsled team.

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Not only is Owen Liam Nolan of Irish descent (D'uh), he was actually born in Dublin, Ireland, that hotbed of ice hockey talent.

Some other NHL'ers and former NHL'ers from far-flung locales include:

The Islander's Richard Park, who was born in Seoul, South Korea, longtime Bruins great Ken Hodge, who originally hailed from Birmingham, England, former Hab and Norris trophy winner Rod Langway, who was born in Taiwan/Chinese Taipei, and my personal favourite, former Hab (74-75 to 80-81), Rick Chartraw, who was born in Caracas, Venezuela.

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Lol not until they discover some technology to make equipment and ice much cheaper.

To tell you the truth I'm sick of the NHL marketing hockey to places where it is not a traditional sport, and I'm not talking about the NHL teams down south. I'm talking about making these pseudo feel good charities where people give sticks and what not to poor, mainly hot countries so people can practice the sport. Seeing these stories in the nhl.com website is just infuriating. I mean come on is the NHL that butthurt about hockey not being as popular as soccer? It's such a shame these people are trying to export such culture (expensive culture) to places like thailand, where the standard of living is so much lower and where it is completely unfriendly to the environment to have a bunch of skating rinks.

Amen.

I have always thought it was as close to pointless as one could get to attempt forcing hockey on parts of the globe where there is no grass-roots level organization of the game already. If kids aren't playing it growing up, chances are they are playing something else... Leading me to believe they probably like what they are already doing much better (i.e. soccer). Sporting is cultural. People play soccer in parts of the world because it worked out that way... You can't just give them a hockey stick and say, "Come on now, play some hockey for the NHL.com website!" Why doesn't the NHL just give them some basic anemities? They could donate food or something.

Ugh... :blink:

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Not only is Owen Liam Nolan of Irish descent (D'uh), he was actually born in Dublin, Ireland, that hotbed of ice hockey talent.

Some other NHL'ers and former NHL'ers from far-flung locales include:

The Islander's Richard Park, who was born in Seoul, South Korea, longtime Bruins great Ken Hodge, who originally hailed from Birmingham, England, former Hab and Norris trophy winner Rod Langway, who was born in Taiwan/Chinese Taipei, and my personal favourite, former Hab (74-75 to 80-81), Rick Chartraw, who was born in Caracas, Venezuela.

Robyn Regehr / Calagary Flames was born in Recife, Brazil. But, he pretty much grew up in Canada.

I would also like to send out props to coach Ted Nolan (Jack Adams winner) born on the Garden River Ojibwas First Nation.

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i know heatley is german and could play for canada or germany olympic teams obviously he chose canada when it comes to hockey thats a no brainer

I dont know if Heatley was born in Germany or not, but I think (in this case for example, but applies to all...) if he was BORN in Germany, he should have to play for the German team, or not play at all. Not really fair to pick Canada just cause, well, we rock at hockey as opposed to the Germans, or any other country. A lot of people in sports have dual citizenship, and would it be fair for them all to play for one country's team just because that team is better?? What if Ovechkin, Malkin, Kovalev, Datsyuk, Zetterberg, Hossa, Kovalchuk, Gaborik, Semin, The Sedins, Havlat, Kopitar, Backstrom, Lunqvist, Kiprusoff, (and the list goes on and on and on..) had dual citizenship, and they all wanted to play for the Canadien team at the olympics? Would be nice, but is it really fair? I dont think so, but thats just my opinion.

(sorry if this was a little off topic) :)

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I dont know if Heatley was born in Germany or not, but I think (in this case for example, but applies to all...) if he was BORN in Germany, he should have to play for the German team, or not play at all. Not really fair to pick Canada just cause, well, we rock at hockey as opposed to the Germans, or any other country. A lot of people in sports have dual citizenship, and would it be fair for them all to play for one country's team just because that team is better?? What if Ovechkin, Malkin, Kovalev, Datsyuk, Zetterberg, Hossa, Kovalchuk, Gaborik, Semin, The Sedins, Havlat, Kopitar, Backstrom, Lunqvist, Kiprusoff, (and the list goes on and on and on..) had dual citizenship, and they all wanted to play for the Canadien team at the olympics? Would be nice, but is it really fair? I dont think so, but thats just my opinion.

(sorry if this was a little off topic) :)

The thing is, though, it also goes the other way in that there are a lot of Canadian nationals playing for the German team. Most of the time I think it's because they play professionally over there and have lived there long enough to qualify. (I can think of John Tripp off the top of my head, but I remember there being quite a few Canadian sounding names on the German and Italian teams in particular). So they might get one superstar in Heatley, but they'd be losing an awful lot of their depth players.

People leave Canada that we could use, as well. I might be way off, but I think I remember that Brett Hull could have played for Canada but chose the US instead because he'd have more of a first line/leadership position when NHL players were first allowed into the Olympics.

It happens in other sports, too. Donovan Bailey for example, sprinter and one of Canada's most famous Olympic athletes, was actually born in Jamaica but chose to compete for us. Once a player of any sport competes for a country internationally, though, you can't ever compete for a different one.

I'm not disagreeing with you (I don't really know if I consider it right or wrong), I'm just saying it's pretty common and it goes both ways.

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The thing is, though, it also goes the other way in that there are a lot of Canadian nationals playing for the German team. Most of the time I think it's because they play professionally over there and have lived there long enough to qualify. (I can think of John Tripp off the top of my head, but I remember there being quite a few Canadian sounding names on the German and Italian teams in particular). So they might get one superstar in Heatley, but they'd be losing an awful lot of their depth players.

People leave Canada that we could use, as well. I might be way off, but I think I remember that Brett Hull could have played for Canada but chose the US instead because he'd have more of a first line/leadership position when NHL players were first allowed into the Olympics.

It happens in other sports, too. Donovan Bailey for example, sprinter and one of Canada's most famous Olympic athletes, was actually born in Jamaica but chose to compete for us. Once a player of any sport competes for a country internationally, though, you can't ever compete for a different one.

I'm not disagreeing with you (I don't really know if I consider it right or wrong), I'm just saying it's pretty common and it goes both ways.

Not to get off topic but remember these ones:

18 February 2006 Winter Olympics / Swiss Men's Hockey Team Shocks Canada : Canadian-born Paul DiPietro scored twice and goalie Martin Gerber turned aside 49 shots. Switzerland wins 2 -0.

Coach Dave King was made a Member of the Order of Canada in 1992, was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame in 1997 .In addition, Dave King was hired to guide the Japanese national team at the Nagano Olympics in 1998

1993-94 Petr Nedvěd became involved in a bitter contract dispute with the Canucks which resulted in a lengthy holdout. While holding out, Nedvěd obtained his Canadian citizenship, and represented Canada at the 1994 Winter Olympics.

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