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What If An Athlete Switched Sports?


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Ever wondered what happened if an athlete changed sports? Here's your chance to tell us what would happen to the athlete!

Example: Synchronized skating and hockey

A synchronized skater (be it male or female) that would leave that area of figure skating to become a hockey player would be a rather fast player and a good mucker in the corners, given that said synchronized skater not become a goaltender. However, I'd say that a failed synchronized skater has acquired some physical flexibility in figure skating so it wouldn't surprise me if said failed synchronized skater went on to become a goaltender.

In reverse: if a failed hockey player became a synchronized skater, it would depend on what position said hockey player played at before going to synchronized skating. If said player was a goaltender, it would probably be easier in some regards, such as the figures themselves, but unless the failed goaltender is a fast skater, he will take as long as a D-man to be any good as a forward, if not longer, to be a good synchronized skater. If said player was a forward or a D-man before going to synchronized skating, the figures will be harder to learn than it would be to a goaltender, although the speed of such players is usually sufficient to have some success in synchronized skating.

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Hockey to basketball:

If that player is anything like Hal Gill or Zdeno Chara, i.e. giant-sized D-men (I even remember a newspaper article saying that Chara could have been a basketball player before sealing his fate as a hockey player) they could be good point guards if they can adapt well to a basketball playbook. In Chara's case, maybe he could play in a NBA farm team, and eventually sign 10-day contracts. However, if it was a Gionta-sized player, even more so if said player was a goaltender, they won't have much of a future in basketball.

In reverse: a failed basketball player could have his chance at goaltending; I mean, such a player would be some good to make saves with the glove. But such players would require some time to adapt to the more physical play and they have developed some speed in basketball so they could be at least as fast as Gill on the ice. Depending on the size of the player, it could be easier to make a hockey player out of a failed basketball player or to make a basketball player out of a hockey player.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hockey to golf:

A player with a good slapshot would have a good long-hitting capability. The ones with better wrist/backhand shots are usually better at approach shots or sand traps. Or dogleg holes. If that player is anything like Kaberle, he would actually have some success in the golfing world. However, goaltenders would need a lot more time to become decent golfers than anyone else.

In reverse: the golfer could be good to shoot at the net but has to develop his/her playmaking capability, both offensively and defensively. If the player has a good "full-swing" then the player could be a good offensive D-player, whereas a player that is better at approach shots would usually have a better backhand or wrist shot and thus be better suited for forward play. In both cases, forget about goaltending.

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Hockey to MMA

seeing how it worked out for Georges Laraque..... no I don't think it would work

Maybe it didn't work for Laraque but it worked for Jeff Kugel (the one player who was expelled from the Windsor Spitfires for a fight back in 1998)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Alpine skiing to hockey:

Since the biomechanics of alpine skiing are pretty similar to that of skating, with some puckhandling training, nothing can prevent an alpine skiier to be a good power forward. In Erik Guay's case, he could end up somewhere in European major-league hockey and, if he plays well in European major-league hockey, he could go to the AHL and eventually be a Hab power forward, if only to go with the likes of Pyatt.

In reverse: the hockey players that make the best alpine skiiers are fast, heavy skaters. Goaltenders may be better in having an aerodynamical shape when skiing, though they may not be as fast as skaters.

http://www.cyberpresse.ca/sports/ski-et-su...eri-et-moen.php (in French)

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Hockey to golf:

A player with a good slapshot would have a good long-hitting capability. The ones with better wrist/backhand shots are usually better at approach shots or sand traps. Or dogleg holes. If that player is anything like Kaberle, he would actually have some success practice in the golfing world.

[...]

There, fixed it for ya B)

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  • 1 month later...
Ever wondered what happened if an athlete changed sports? Here's your chance to tell us what would happen to the athlete!

Example: Synchronized skating and hockey

A synchronized skater (be it male or female) that would leave that area of figure skating to become a hockey player would be a rather fast player and a good mucker in the corners, given that said synchronized skater not become a goaltender. However, I'd say that a failed synchronized skater has acquired some physical flexibility in figure skating so it wouldn't surprise me if said failed synchronized skater went on to become a goaltender.

In reverse: if a failed hockey player became a synchronized skater, it would depend on what position said hockey player played at before going to synchronized skating. If said player was a goaltender, it would probably be easier in some regards, such as the figures themselves, but unless the failed goaltender is a fast skater, he will take as long as a D-man to be any good as a forward, if not longer, to be a good synchronized skater. If said player was a forward or a D-man before going to synchronized skating, the figures will be harder to learn than it would be to a goaltender, although the speed of such players is usually sufficient to have some success in synchronized skating.

Any hockey player will hit there toe picks before they do anything figure skating related :P

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