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Jacques Martin 2010-11


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It was more of a case of a team with a bigger defense stopping us. Philadelphia was bigger, stronger on defense than we had offensively, and we got pushed around. Simple as that.

I duno, we just ran into a hot goalie and our PP died. We were able to put up 27+ shots in 4 of the 5 games. They put up total shots of 25, 23, 26, 24 and 25. Realistically, Philly was probably just as beat up/tired as our guys were because they just came out of a war themselves in that Boston series. Our system just didn't work. We were able to keep the shot totals down (way lower than what Halak faced in the first two rounds), or Philly just figured out that if they keep the shot totals below 30 they were guaranteed victory :P. Either case, the "system" JM had going into the third round of the playoffs collapsed. It didn't work, our offense went to sleep and nothing he did was able to wake it up.

We probably don't see something totally new, in terms of the system, but I hope that we see some changes/tweaks.

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We lost because we had no offense and Halak was only average in the Philly series, he couldn't bail us out like he'd done against Washington and to a lesser extent Pitttsburgh. We were shut out in three of the four ECF games facing a goalie who got lit up in the final by a team that showed why they deserved to win the Cup.

Offense has been and will continue to be a problem for this team unless Martin adapts his system to suit our player strengths.

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We lost because we had no offense and Halak was only average in the Philly series, he couldn't bail us out like he'd done against Washington and to a lesser extent Pitttsburgh. We were shut out in three of the four ECF games facing a goalie who got lit up in the final by a team that showed why they deserved to win the Cup.

Offense has been and will continue to be a problem for this team unless Martin adapts his system to suit our player strengths.

Once again you are bang on Weeps.

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With our forwards, we should be forcing the pace with a quick transition game, crisp passes, and lots of lateral movement that would allow our wingers time to get free, confuse defenders about matchups, and increase our time of possession over a game. We should also do our best to stay away from the grinding game below the hash marks as only one of our top-six forwards (Kostitsyn) is physically equipped and mentally willing to play that game effectively over an 82-game season. Essentially, if we can't cycle below the hash marks (i.e. keep our feet moving, keep defenders in chase mode, and avoid taking hits), we should avoid those areas of the ice as sustained time there will likely only lead to turnovers and injuries.

Finally, chip and chase should not be the primary method of advancing the puck for our top-six forwards, none of whom are robust enough to win back possession of the puck along the wall. With controlled five-man breakouts, we should carry the puck forward with speed using center/winger pairs (Plekanec-Cammalleri and Gomez-Gionta), while the third winger (Kostitsyn or Pouliot) accelerates along the wall to provide a stretch option if other teams get too aggressive in the neutral zone. Andrei and Benoit are two players I'd like to see in space near the faceoff dots with the puck, not turning the puck over in the neutral zone. The way to get them in space is to force teams to overcommit to the rest of the line and let them find dead-ice spots to set up for shots or drive to the net.

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With our forwards, we should be forcing the pace with a quick transition game, crisp passes, and lots of lateral movement that would allow our wingers time to get free, confuse defenders about matchups, and increase our time of possession over a game. We should also do our best to stay away from the grinding game below the hash marks as only one of our top-six forwards (Kostitsyn) is physically equipped and mentally willing to play that game effectively over an 82-game season. Essentially, if we can't cycle below the hash marks (i.e. keep our feet moving, keep defenders in chase mode, and avoid taking hits), we should avoid those areas of the ice as sustained time there will likely only lead to turnovers and injuries.

Finally, chip and chase should not be the primary method of advancing the puck for our top-six forwards, none of whom are robust enough to win back possession of the puck along the wall. With controlled five-man breakouts, we should carry the puck forward with speed using center/winger pairs (Plekanec-Cammalleri and Gomez-Gionta), while the third winger (Kostitsyn or Pouliot) accelerates along the wall to provide a stretch option if other teams get too aggressive in the neutral zone. Andrei and Benoit are two players I'd like to see in space near the faceoff dots with the puck, not turning the puck over in the neutral zone. The way to get them in space is to force teams to overcommit to the rest of the line and let them find dead-ice spots to set up for shots or drive to the net.

Can somebody get this message to JM ^^^^

Mark it as 'urgent' ;)

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With our forwards, we should be forcing the pace with a quick transition game, crisp passes, and lots of lateral movement that would allow our wingers time to get free, confuse defenders about matchups, and increase our time of possession over a game. We should also do our best to stay away from the grinding game below the hash marks as only one of our top-six forwards (Kostitsyn) is physically equipped and mentally willing to play that game effectively over an 82-game season. Essentially, if we can't cycle below the hash marks (i.e. keep our feet moving, keep defenders in chase mode, and avoid taking hits), we should avoid those areas of the ice as sustained time there will likely only lead to turnovers and injuries.

Finally, chip and chase should not be the primary method of advancing the puck for our top-six forwards, none of whom are robust enough to win back possession of the puck along the wall. With controlled five-man breakouts, we should carry the puck forward with speed using center/winger pairs (Plekanec-Cammalleri and Gomez-Gionta), while the third winger (Kostitsyn or Pouliot) accelerates along the wall to provide a stretch option if other teams get too aggressive in the neutral zone. Andrei and Benoit are two players I'd like to see in space near the faceoff dots with the puck, not turning the puck over in the neutral zone. The way to get them in space is to force teams to overcommit to the rest of the line and let them find dead-ice spots to set up for shots or drive to the net.

You make some good points Weep but here's my take on this.

It's not that I disagree with what you're saying but it's hard to script scenarios in hockey. When breaking out, the defense plays the most important role. They quarterback the breakout. They have to be able to read what style of forecheck the other team is playing and adapt, so do the forwards. I'll cite some examples. What you stated above can work in a passive 1-2-2 forecheck and even with an aggressive 1-2-2 forecheck. However, if there's a 2-2-1, 2-1-2 or 2-3 forecheck then what you're proposing doesn't work. You can't make stretch passes when the passing lanes are closed and you have to chip the puck out in some situations.

What I do with my team, and I'm sure all teams do this, is I've given them a booklet that I've created with different breakouts based on combatting different forechecks. The players have to study them and we practice them once a week. The hardest part with all this is identifying at all times what the other team is throwing your way.

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You make some good points Weep but here's my take on this.

It's not that I disagree with what you're saying but it's hard to script scenarios in hockey. When breaking out, the defense plays the most important role. They quarterback the breakout. They have to be able to read what style of forecheck the other team is playing and adapt, so do the forwards. I'll cite some examples. What you stated above can work in a passive 1-2-2 forecheck and even with an aggressive 1-2-2 forecheck. However, if there's a 2-2-1, 2-1-2 or 2-3 forecheck then what you're proposing doesn't work. You can't make stretch passes when the passing lanes are closed and you have to chip the puck out in some situations.

What I do with my team, and I'm sure all teams do this, is I've given them a booklet that I've created with different breakouts based on combatting different forechecks. The players have to study them and we practice them once a week. The hardest part with all this is identifying at all times what the other team is throwing your way.

Absolutely, Coach, and I may have overstated the case in my initial post. I agree with you that you can't script breakouts because you always have to adjust to what's happening on the ice. So there will be times when chip and chase will be required, for example. Adjustments are part of what I expect Martin & co. to bring each game. My post was more about what our ideal breakout and offensive game should look like rather than a rigid script we have to follow at all times. It just seemed to me last season that our own system was interfering with our ability to force the pace and maximize our player assets (speed, shiftiness, vision) while playing to our weaknesses (lack of size and physicality, poor presence below the hash marks). Essentially, I think our system needs to be geared to what I described above, but it also needs to be flexible enough to respond to what's transpiring 'on the ground'.

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Absolutely, Coach, and I may have overstated the case in my initial post. I agree with you that you can't script breakouts because you always have to adjust to what's happening on the ice. So there will be times when chip and chase will be required, for example. Adjustments are part of what I expect Martin & co. to bring each game. My post was more about what our ideal breakout and offensive game should look like rather than a rigid script we have to follow at all times. It just seemed to me last season that our own system was interfering with our ability to force the pace and maximize our player assets (speed, shiftiness, vision) while playing to our weaknesses (lack of size and physicality, poor presence below the hash marks). Essentially, I think our system needs to be geared to what I described above, but it also needs to be flexible enough to respond to what's transpiring 'on the ground'.

I think that what you've been saying time and time again since last year makes a lot of sense. You've been stressing that the forwards break out as a unit with short crisp passes and I fully agree that this would make the most sense for a speedy team like the Habs. It's unfortunate and I hate to say this, but with the exception of Markov, our defensemen are not agile enough or pass well enough to execute these types of breakouts.

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I think that what you've been saying time and time again since last year makes a lot of sense. You've been stressing that the forwards break out as a unit with short crisp passes and I fully agree that this would make the most sense for a speedy team like the Habs. It's unfortunate and I hate to say this, but with the exception of Markov, our defensemen are not agile enough or pass well enough to execute these types of breakouts.

You may be right, sadly, though I am hoping that with Subban in the fold, we'll see an improvement in our zone breakouts.

I also believe that Spacek would be far more effective with his first passes if he were playing on his natural (left) side.

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The Habs have the speed and talent in place now it's up to the coaches to get the most out of each line while still playing a sound defensive game. The play of Carey Price will have a lot to do with how much offense is created, if Carey can hold his own his confidence will spill over to the rest of the team.

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You may be right, sadly, though I am hoping that with Subban in the fold, we'll see an improvement in our zone breakouts.

I also believe that Spacek would be far more effective with his first passes if he were playing on his natural (left) side.

I would love to see Spacek playing on the Left side and we just might see that with Markov being injured right now. Hopefully he can be effective and they make the changes they need to make to the line up.

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No matter the system, I wish we'll start to be the agressor for a minimum of 50% of the game, just not defending during 55 minutes

Totally agree. My favourite game last year system-wise was that game against the Rangers in January where we smoked them. Now, the Rags and King Henry did not play well, and I do not expect that kind of dominance very often. But the aggressive system we used is what I would love to see on a consistent basis. That was also Martin's piece de résistance as a coach IMO; his line matching was masterful.

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Totally agree. My favourite game last year system-wise was that game against the Rangers in January where we smoked them. Now, the Rags and King Henry did not play well, and I do not expect that kind of dominance very often. But the aggressive system we used is what I would love to see on a consistent basis. That was also Martin's piece de résistance as a coach IMO; his line matching was masterful.

Jacques really showed his experience in the playoffs, speaking of that game last January in the playoffs he was on the chip every game getting the matchups we needed and having the right guys out in the right situations. no coincidence that for the first time in 17 years that we have an experienced coach and we make a run to the east final

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The booing didn’t go over well with most of his teammates, but it didn’t seem to concern coach Jacques Martin.

“The fans here are passionate and they have a right to express their opinions,” said Martin.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/sports/Jeer...l#ixzz10SJjVNHC

Really disappointed in Jacques. This was a chance for him to show his support for Carey and make it unequivocally clear that fans who want to boo individual Habs players are not welcome. Instead, he spouted the usual platitudes about freedom of expression. This may be a shock to you, Jacques, but freedom of expression is completely beside the point. It's not about what fans are legally allowed to do; it's about creating a proper home environment so that the team can feed off the crowd, not be demoralized by them.

Lord knows I wasn't Gainey's biggest fan when he was GM, but how I wish he'd weigh in on this issue now the way he did in defense of Brisebois.

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Without the fan.....you have no sport......they feed this entertainment industry with piles and piles of their hard earned cash. The fan has a meagure income when compared to the sporting heroes they follow.

Censorship of the fans is not what sports is about.

Martin was right not to defend Price.

Price can defend himself by playing well for the team or moving on to somewhere else.

In sport.......only the strong survive......sometimes the young are eaten by their parents.........this is a professional sport.....where skills are at their highest.

That's what people pay for & should expect. It's no fun to watch millionaire "fumblers".........fans want to be entertained with excellence not an amateurish display.

Mr. Martin.....you did well......you are a coach ....not a nursemaid.....each man is responsible for his own actions & you have kept this principle as you should to keep the game strong

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i hope he puts more focus on offesne i mean i know we did so great in the playoffs cuz of defense but still if were gonan play defenseivly get some hits in there like we did last game i want us to not be a team that gets bullied and im gonna say it again i hope pierre manages to trade for a big bodied forward like brian boyle or clutterbuck and then we can switch eller and boyle up thats if eller plays nhl this year and clutterbuck can be the other winger with lappy and boyle in the playoffs and we can even put boyle in front of the night and maybe put pk and markov on point so they can rip shots from the blueline while the goalie is screened by boyle

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The booing didn’t go over well with most of his teammates, but it didn’t seem to concern coach Jacques Martin.

“The fans here are passionate and they have a right to express their opinions,” said Martin.

Read more: http://www.montrealgazette.com/sports/Jeer...l#ixzz10SJjVNHC

Really disappointed in Jacques.

He did the same thing last year ...it's too bad <_<

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Weep, I am disappointed in Jacques for a different set of reasons:

# 1 - Doesn't look like 'our system' evolved from last season at all; We will still try to score 2-3 goals early and then hang on for dear life while our goalie begs for mercy, even in the preseason!

#2 - Our defensive zone coverage in the slot area is attrocious, we have no concept of man coverage in the slot.

#3 - Offensively, we enter the zone without speed and then dump it in and seem generally surprised that our tiny forwards are not able to retrieve the puck.

#4 - The breakout is so predictable and easy to forecheck against, for all the risks that PK will take at least he can clear the zone 85% of the time which is 35% more than the usual way.

#5 - Our PP strategy refuses to evolve from the perimeter blast theory. Time to place a big body in front and have 4 guys constantly in motion on the outside, in the preseason I would try some forwards on the point to offer a different look. Why not have a PP unit of: Subban, Cammalleri, Plekanec, Kostitsyn AND Eller to start the season? Then: Hamrlik, Carle, Gomez, Gionta and Pouliot.

Anyway, my overall concern is that Jacques and management as a whole are fully aware of how lucky they were last season riding Halak but just lack the creativity and vision to develop a system and culture that will ACTUALLY work long term without a 4 month miracle run by a goalie every season.

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Bottom Line: We need more mobile defenseman and more net presence up front.

I don't care if the forwards are big or not but if they hang around the crease consistently they can play on my habs anyday. As for the D, it's not viable to have both Spacek and Gill on the ice for 40% of the game during the regular season, they are playoff players that need the relaxed officating to be able to get away with a few hooks and grabs, otherwise their lack of speed gets exploited and results in open chances or penalties. You simply cannot have 2 slow defenseman as part of your Top 5, as it is Hamrlik is no speed demon either and O'byrne isnt likely winning any races to the puck as well.

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Interesting PP set up this season. One d-man at the blue line and one in the slot, not sure how that'll look or do really but it's interesting.

well suited for subban's set of skills.

i'm curious to see how Markie will fare with this, methinks very well.

This PP pattern clearly comes from what Boucher was doing in Hamilton last year but also, this year it's Muller who is in charge of coaching the PP and Pern the PK. It's about time the Habs assign the offensive missions to offence specialists and the defensive mission to defense specialists. **flashbacks of Jarvis being in charge of the PP - shudders**

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