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2015-2016 Supplementary discipline hearings


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Winnipeg Jets forward Alexander Burmistrov has been fined $4,166.67, the maximum allowable under the Collective Bargaining Agreement, for elbowing Minnesota

Wild defenseman Jared Spurgeon during NHL Game No. 118 in Winnipeg on Sunday, October 26, the National Hockey League's Department of Player Safety announced today.


The incident occurred at 13:11 of the second period. Burmistrov was assessed a minor penalty for elbowing.

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Ottawa Senators forward Mark Stone will have a hearing Monday with the NHL Department of Player Safety for an illegal check to the head of Detroit Red Wings forward Landon Ferraro during a 5-3 Detroit win Saturday at Canadian Tire Centre in Ottawa.


Stone received a minor penalty for the illegal check, which took place at 11:08 of the second period.


Ferraro later returned in the second period.
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Ottawa Senators forward Mark Stone will have a hearing Monday with the NHL Department of Player Safety for an illegal check to the head of Detroit Red Wings forward Landon Ferraro during a 5-3 Detroit win Saturday at Canadian Tire Centre in Ottawa.
Stone received a minor penalty for the illegal check, which took place at 11:08 of the second period.
Ferraro later returned in the second period.

Stone got two games. NHL.com.

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Guest habs1952

Someone please explain to me the difference between the Stone suspension and the Byfuglien non-suspension... hits looked pretty similar to me, and Buff has the repeat offender status.

Byfuglien did his dirty deed against a Hab. <_<:D

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Someone please explain to me the difference between the Stone suspension and the Byfuglien non-suspension... hits looked pretty similar to me, and Buff has the repeat offender status.

Dreger explained on TSN this morning that repeat offender status is only considered if there is actually a suspension. So if they did suspend him he would automatically be given more games, but it doesn't make him more likely to be suspended.

So to me this might mean that, in typical paradoxical NHL fashion, a repeat offender might actually be less likely to be suspended for a smaller infraction. Where normally you might look at a hit and give somebody a game, that's no longer an option because of the repeat offender status. So if faced with a less severe infraction and the choice of giving nothing or giving five games, maybe they just end up rounding down to the nothing.

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So to me this might mean that, in typical paradoxical NHL fashion, a repeat offender might actually be less likely to be suspended for a smaller infraction. Where normally you might look at a hit and give somebody a game, that's no longer an option because of the repeat offender status. So if faced with a less severe infraction and the choice of giving nothing or giving five games, maybe they just end up rounding down to the nothing.

Anything to protect the players whose eyes light up when they see a chance to injure someone. Business as usual.

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Guest habs1952

Dreger explained on TSN this morning that repeat offender status is only considered if there is actually a suspension. So if they did suspend him he would automatically be given more games, but it doesn't make him more likely to be suspended.

So to me this might mean that, in typical paradoxical NHL fashion, a repeat offender might actually be less likely to be suspended for a smaller infraction. Where normally you might look at a hit and give somebody a game, that's no longer an option because of the repeat offender status. So if faced with a less severe infraction and the choice of giving nothing or giving five games, maybe they just end up rounding down to the nothing.

If I heard correctly while watching the game Byfuglien was already warned three times this season for questionable hits. Obviously the league takes injury into account before it will suspend anyone.

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Dreger explained on TSN this morning that repeat offender status is only considered if there is actually a suspension. So if they did suspend him he would automatically be given more games, but it doesn't make him more likely to be suspended.

So to me this might mean that, in typical paradoxical NHL fashion, a repeat offender might actually be less likely to be suspended for a smaller infraction. Where normally you might look at a hit and give somebody a game, that's no longer an option because of the repeat offender status. So if faced with a less severe infraction and the choice of giving nothing or giving five games, maybe they just end up rounding down to the nothing.

This is my thinking too, and I think the NHL has done the same thing with Kadri, whose had 4-5 flagrant hits already this year too. In both cases, I think the NHL said, it's bad but if we do anything we're going to have to do something big and we don't want to do that, so as you said, they rounded down. Which means it completely defeats the purpose of enforcing rules. Like you, I think repeat offender status does come into play in their decisions, but that it may encourage rounding down rather than up. It's the same thing with refs on the ice, they think that by not giving out a penalty for an infraction that they're influencing the game less, when in fact they're doing more harm to the outcome.

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