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Washington Capitals winger Carl Hagelin is expected to miss an extended period of time because of an eye injury.  Hagelin was struck in the left eye with an errant stick during practice Tuesday. It was not immediately clear if the 33-year-old Swede will need surgery. May increase efforts to trade for Lehky.

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4 hours ago, jennifer_rocket said:

The athletes or players have nothing to do with what a Dictator like Putin does. Russia is not a free country they cannot openly speak out with fear of repercussions. For Canada to ask it's corporations to cut all ties or it's people to not buy Russian products is different as those measures will affect Russia. You'll just end up punishing the wrong people. 

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4 hours ago, jennifer_rocket said:

 

25 minutes ago, CaptWelly said:

The athletes or players have nothing to do with what a Dictator like Putin does. Russia is not a free country they cannot openly speak out with fear of repercussions. For Canada to ask it's corporations to cut all ties or it's people to not buy Russian products is different as those measures will affect Russia. You'll just end up punishing the wrong people. 

Yeah, you can't just universally punish all Russians because their government is run by a lunatic. I agree with what Welly said here, it's one thing to target banks and corporations and inflict financial pain on the country. It's another to go after individuals who may not even support the actions of the country. Maybe not to the same degree of punishment, but this has the flavor of Japanese people in Canada being put into internment camps during WW2 because of the actions of Japan. It's group punishment by association, which is ethically wrong on a lot of levels.

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Ideally the players would step up and denounce Putin, but as i've mentioned before, they have family and friends back home to worry about. Unless they come forward and openly support Putin, IMO you can't blackball these guys just because they originate from Russia. There are millions of Russians currently taking huge risks of personal harm back home in protest of this war, so you can't paint them all with the same brush. The idiots that are threatening these guys both publicly and on social media need to take a step back and think this out. I can just imagine the pressure these guys are playing under.

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Just now, electron58 said:

 

They couldn't figure out a conditional value? Never understood that.

IMO, to be determined later.

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The Edmonton Oilers have signed a trio of players to contracts that will begin in 2022-23.  Forward James Hamblin and defenceman Vincent Desharnais both inked two-year deals, while defenceman Dmitri Samorukov inked a one-year.  Samorukov, 22, has been re-signed after coming off his entry-level deal. Initially inked in 2017, the deal was pushed twice before kicking off in 2019-20.

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13 hours ago, electron58 said:

Washington Capitals winger Carl Hagelin is expected to miss an extended period of time because of an eye injury.  Hagelin was struck in the left eye with an errant stick during practice Tuesday. It was not immediately clear if the 33-year-old Swede will need surgery. May increase efforts to trade for Lehky.

Surgery was performed.  

 

 

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15 hours ago, kinot-2 said:

So, Romanov would have to be sent back?

 

11 hours ago, CaptWelly said:

The athletes or players have nothing to do with what a Dictator like Putin does. Russia is not a free country they cannot openly speak out with fear of repercussions. For Canada to ask it's corporations to cut all ties or it's people to not buy Russian products is different as those measures will affect Russia. You'll just end up punishing the wrong people. 

 

10 hours ago, BigTed3 said:

Yeah, you can't just universally punish all Russians because their government is run by a lunatic. I agree with what Welly said here, it's one thing to target banks and corporations and inflict financial pain on the country. It's another to go after individuals who may not even support the actions of the country. Maybe not to the same degree of punishment, but this has the flavor of Japanese people in Canada being put into internment camps during WW2 because of the actions of Japan. It's group punishment by association, which is ethically wrong on a lot of levels.

 

10 hours ago, electron58 said:

So, guilty by association!  Just like they caged up the Japanese? & crucified the Germans? Just because of where their homeland was? Seems kind of extreme & irrational!

I'm saying I agree with rich Russian athletes not being allowed to play sports in Canada for a period of time.

I'm not saying all Russians are guilty by association.

Nor am I advocating to cage anyone up or crucify anyone, Electron58.

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I think I'm kind of with JR on this one.  I mean who do you think is truly hurt when the world locks out Russian banks and corporations?  Do you think the CEOs of those corporations are going to be standing in the bread line?  With all of these sanctions, it's going to be the poor and middle class Russian people - most of whom probably care little for politics one way or another and are just trying to live their lives, same as anyone - who really feel the brunt of it.  I'm not saying that the sanctions are wrong - it's a really terrible situation and this does seem like the best way to deal with it - but I don't see a moral difference between shutting out Russian corporations and shutting out Russian hockey players.  If anything it's actually one of the least damaging options, as I doubt Romanov or whoever will go hungry as a result.

 

Edit: And there's also a pretty big difference between banning popular public figures from playing a sport and putting people in jail.  No this wouldn't be fair at all to the players who are kicked out, but that's kind of the point of sanctions... it's not about being fair, it's about provoking a response

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Manatee-X said:

I think I'm kind of with JR on this one.  I mean who do you think is truly hurt when the world locks out Russian banks and corporations?  Do you think the CEOs of those corporations are going to be standing in the bread line?  With all of these sanctions, it's going to be the poor and middle class Russian people - most of whom probably care little for politics one way or another and are just trying to live their lives, same as anyone - who really feel the brunt of it.  I'm not saying that the sanctions are wrong - it's a really terrible situation and this does seem like the best way to deal with it - but I don't see a moral difference between shutting out Russian corporations and shutting out Russian hockey players.  If anything it's actually one of the least damaging options, as I doubt Romanov or whoever will go hungry as a result.

 

Edit: And there's also a pretty big difference between banning popular public figures from playing a sport and putting people in jail.  No this wouldn't be fair at all to the players who are kicked out, but that's kind of the point of sanctions... it's not about being fair, it's about provoking a response

 

 

The sanctions on Russian organizations and banks are there to cripple the Russian economy. They have already devalued the Ruble and weakened Russia's ability to purchase raw materials to make weapons. It makes it more difficult for them to pay their military. It may increase the chances that the Russian people get fed up and topple their own government. There may be pros and cons to this strategy, but at least there are clear and direct impacts of these measures on trying to shorten the war and reduce casualties. I'm not sure I can say the same thing about banning Russian hockey players from the NHL. How does Malkin or Romanov not playing in the NHL choke the Russian position in the war? Many of these players may be completely against the war but still have family (parents, siblings, children, wives) in Russia and fear repercussions if they were to adamantly speak out.

Imagine your entire family were wrongfully imprisoned somewhere and the warden of the jail decided to organize a group to corrupt law enforcement officers to start killing civilians in the name of the "law"... now what's more likely to be helpful to stalling this? Preventing the warden and his gang from accessing money and supplies? Or firing you and other family members of the prisoners from your jobs on account of your association, in hopes that you'll protest? That's got to be what it feels like right now to be Russian.

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24 minutes ago, Manatee-X said:

I think I'm kind of with JR on this one.  I mean who do you think is truly hurt when the world locks out Russian banks and corporations?  Do you think the CEOs of those corporations are going to be standing in the bread line?  With all of these sanctions, it's going to be the poor and middle class Russian people - most of whom probably care little for politics one way or another and are just trying to live their lives, same as anyone - who really feel the brunt of it.  I'm not saying that the sanctions are wrong - it's a really terrible situation and this does seem like the best way to deal with it - but I don't see a moral difference between shutting out Russian corporations and shutting out Russian hockey players.  If anything it's actually one of the least damaging options, as I doubt Romanov or whoever will go hungry as a result.

 

Edit: And there's also a pretty big difference between banning popular public figures from playing a sport and putting people in jail.  No this wouldn't be fair at all to the players who are kicked out, but that's kind of the point of sanctions... it's not about being fair, it's about provoking a response

 

 

The CEO's and Very rich of Russia can survive yes. That said they are the ones who are going to be able to put pressure on Putin. I do still disagree with punishing Russian players. The players themselves may be able to survive but the players not playing have no consequence to Putin. If a corporation cannot access a market (oil) or whatever it does affect Putin as it reduces the country of Russia financially. All wars cost a lot of money. Also corporations stopping working with any country can have direct affect on parts supplies ect. 

Also, if we start punishing individual actors' hockey players ect. What happens when it starts to extend into other areas? The NHL has basically already punished Canadian hockey teams when Canada had different COVID protocols. A country's political stance could be a slippery slope as they say. The US just got over a President that would try to punish anyone who disagreed or spoke out against him. We also now have a "woke" culture that is going too far. 

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5 minutes ago, BigTed3 said:

The sanctions on Russian organizations and banks are there to cripple the Russian economy. They have already devalued the Ruble and weakened Russia's ability to purchase raw materials to make weapons. It makes it more difficult for them to pay their military. It may increase the chances that the Russian people get fed up and topple their own government. There may be pros and cons to this strategy, but at least there are clear and direct impacts of these measures on trying to shorten the war and reduce casualties. I'm not sure I can say the same thing about banning Russian hockey players from the NHL. How does Malkin or Romanov not playing in the NHL choke the Russian position in the war? Many of these players may be completely against the war but still have family (parents, siblings, children, wives) in Russia and fear repercussions if they were to adamantly speak out.

Imagine your entire family were wrongfully imprisoned somewhere and the warden of the jail decided to organize a group to corrupt law enforcement officers to start killing civilians in the name of the "law"... now what's more likely to be helpful to stalling this? Preventing the warden and his gang from accessing money and supplies? Or firing you and other family members of the prisoners from your jobs on account of your association, in hopes that you'll protest? That's got to be what it feels like right now to be Russian.

The sanctions will also have a measurable negative impact on the average Russian citizen. Many of who could be against this war. Telling privileged Russian NHLers they cannot play in Canada is an inconvenience to them. It also doesn't mean Alexander Ovechkin (or anyone else) has to speak out against Putin and endanger his family. But they should be inconvenienced.

I am pro sanction and I am pro inconvenience. I think that governments and companies should take steps to inconvenience Russia and its people in this moment. I am not proposing anything dire happen to Russian professional athletes in Canada, but I do think we should inconvenience them. You shouldn't get to accrue all of the benefits of having grown up in Russia under an autocratic regime that relies on Western European oil dependency to fund itself, and then not be inconvenienced when your country starts murdering civilians in Kyiv. 

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10 minutes ago, BigTed3 said:

The sanctions on Russian organizations and banks are there to cripple the Russian economy. They have already devalued the Ruble and weakened Russia's ability to purchase raw materials to make weapons. It makes it more difficult for them to pay their military. It may increase the chances that the Russian people get fed up and topple their own government. There may be pros and cons to this strategy, but at least there are clear and direct impacts of these measures on trying to shorten the war and reduce casualties. I'm not sure I can say the same thing about banning Russian hockey players from the NHL. How does Malkin or Romanov not playing in the NHL choke the Russian position in the war? Many of these players may be completely against the war but still have family (parents, siblings, children, wives) in Russia and fear repercussions if they were to adamantly speak out.

Imagine your entire family were wrongfully imprisoned somewhere and the warden of the jail decided to organize a group to corrupt law enforcement officers to start killing civilians in the name of the "law"... now what's more likely to be helpful to stalling this? Preventing the warden and his gang from accessing money and supplies? Or firing you and other family members of the prisoners from your jobs on account of your association, in hopes that you'll protest? That's got to be what it feels like right now to be Russian.

There have already been thousands locked up for speaking out. We are very fortunate and cannot judge others by our freedom of standards. The trucker protest would of never happened in Russia. It's unfortunate.

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2 minutes ago, jennifer_rocket said:

The sanctions will also have a measurable negative impact on the average Russian citizen. Many of who could be against this war. Telling privileged Russian NHLers they cannot play in Canada is an inconvenience to them. It also doesn't mean Alexander Ovechkin (or anyone else) has to speak out against Putin and endanger his family. But they should be inconvenienced.

I am pro sanction and I am pro inconvenience. I think that governments and companies should take steps to inconvenience Russia and its people in this moment. I am not proposing anything dire happen to Russian professional athletes in Canada, but I do think we should inconvenience them. You shouldn't get to accrue all of the benefits of having grown up in Russia under an autocratic regime that relies on Western European oil dependency to fund itself, and then not be inconvenienced when your country starts murdering civilians in Kyiv. 

So you're punished for where you grow up? You're punished for where you are born? 

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